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Hi Guys

 

I have a pair of Shimano model PD-M424 clipless pedals on my cross country bike. What i find disappointing is that it seems that the design has poor sensitivity when it comes to adjustment.

 

Attempts to adjust the spring tension by means of turning the adjustment screw in or out has little effect on the effort required to get the cleat out of the pedal. It is a question of ridiculously easy or extremely difficult.

 

I  am expecting delivery of a trail bike soon and am hoping to purchase better pedals for the new bike. 

 

I have noticed that Cycle Lab is selling Look Xtrack pedals at 50% off. To the untrained eye it looks like the cleats for the 2 types of pedal might be similar. (i am keeping the Shimano's on the cross country bike but intend to use the same shoe-cleat on both bikes.

 

Will the Shimano cleat work on the Look pedal?

 

Any advice is welcome.

 

Thanks

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Hi Guys

 

I have a pair of Shimano model PD-M424 clipless pedals on my cross country bike. What i find disappointing is that it seems that the design has poor sensitivity when it comes to adjustment.

 

Attempts to adjust the spring tension by means of turning the adjustment screw in or out has little effect on the effort required to get the cleat out of the pedal. It is a question of ridiculously easy or extremely difficult.

 

I  am expecting delivery of a trail bike soon and am hoping to purchase better pedals for the new bike. 

 

I have noticed that Cycle Lab is selling Look Xtrack pedals at 50% off. To the untrained eye it looks like the cleats for the 2 types of pedal might be similar. (i am keeping the Shimano's on the cross country bike but intend to use the same shoe-cleat on both bikes.

 

Will the Shimano cleat work on the Look pedal?

 

Any advice is welcome.

 

Thanks

Lubricate the moving parts on the pedals - use a very thin oil that penetrates between the sliding parts - might take a couple of applications, but they will improve significantly - Q20 or 3 in 1 or tool in a can or similar should do the trick - it is kind of hard to see where it has to go - just spray on all the cracks you can see and then clip in and out several times and repeat - then wipe off the excess off the pedal.

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Hi Guys

 

I have a pair of Shimano model PD-M424 clipless pedals on my cross country bike. What i find disappointing is that it seems that the design has poor sensitivity when it comes to adjustment.

 

Attempts to adjust the spring tension by means of turning the adjustment screw in or out has little effect on the effort required to get the cleat out of the pedal. It is a question of ridiculously easy or extremely difficult.

 

I  am expecting delivery of a trail bike soon and am hoping to purchase better pedals for the new bike. 

 

I have noticed that Cycle Lab is selling Look Xtrack pedals at 50% off. To the untrained eye it looks like the cleats for the 2 types of pedal might be similar. (i am keeping the Shimano's on the cross country bike but intend to use the same shoe-cleat on both bikes.

 

Will the Shimano cleat work on the Look pedal?

 

Any advice is welcome.

 

Thanks

yes.

 

They are cross compatible. I have xtracks on my bike and the wife has shimano pdm540's. i can cleat in on both bikes equally well when i'm busy indexing her gears or whatever. The shimanos are a bit stiffer in the sense that the lowest setting on the shimano spring is probably around midway on the Looks. the shimanos have n more positive click on the lower en of the tension....the looks you have to crank in a few turns to achieve a similar feel.

The looks you can set the springs very loose if you like a softer/ seemless clip in and dont like to feel like your feet are bolted to the pedals.

Edited by morneS555
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Lubricate the moving parts on the pedals - use a very thin oil that penetrates between the sliding parts - might take a couple of applications, but they will improve significantly - Q20 or 3 in 1 or tool in a can or similar should do the trick - it is kind of hard to see where it has to go - just spray on all the cracks you can see and then clip in and out several times and repeat - then wipe off the excess off the pedal.

+1 for this, I've doused my pedals in Q20 after every wash just to disperse any renaining water and to lubricate the moving bits and I definitely have a fine level of adjustment on the spring tension. What you're describing sounds like static friction on the hinge surface of the moving clip or in the spring, both of which will be solved with lubrication.

 

Also, you're not gonna break anything with Q20, so you can soak the pedal with it and cleat in and out a few times to get it into the gaps you're looking to lubricate.

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Also check shoe wear where the pedal meets the shoe. Over time the cleat wears as well as the shoe surface. This results in a lot of vertical play in the cleat which no amount of tension will solve. Tension only adjusts the release pressure not the "looseness" of the cleat pedal interface.

 

New cleats work ,or fit the shoe is worn use the cleat plates between the shoe and the cleat.

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Buy a set of eggbeaters. Problem solved.

But they have huge float and break quite easily. Sh!tmano at least know how to make Fishing reels, Cranks and Pedals. Other bike components I am not sold on just yet.

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But they have huge float and break quite easily. Sh!tmano at least know how to make Fishing reels, Cranks and Pedals. Other bike components I am not sold on just yet.

Had the same pair for 2 years. Grease once a year. I personally would not use any other pedals. Can't stand sh!tmano.

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Had the same pair for 2 years. Grease once a year. I personally would not use any other pedals. Can't stand sh!tmano.

Cool I presume you are a lightweight and enjoy lots of float.

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Had the same pair for 2 years. Grease once a year. I personally would not use any other pedals. Can't stand sh!tmano.

I have a set of shimano spd's I have been using since 1991.... broken many sets of spuds - never again.

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+1 for this, I've doused my pedals in Q20 after every wash just to disperse any renaining water and to lubricate the moving bits and I definitely have a fine level of adjustment on the spring tension. What you're describing sounds like static friction on the hinge surface of the moving clip or in the spring, both of which will be solved with lubrication.

 

Also, you're not gonna break anything with Q20, so you can soak the pedal with it and cleat in and out a few times to get it into the gaps you're looking to lubricate.

There is a whole block of moving metal in the pedal - just make sure that block is properly lubed

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