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Bike Lights - To be Seen


PygaSchmyga

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Some hubber knowledge would be appreciated - What is an acceptable lumen rating for both a front light and back light for riding in full son to be seen by oncoming as well as rear-approaching cars? 

I have been looking around at various light options and am getting a bit overwhelmed.  I have no desire to ride in the dark, so illuminating the road or trail is not important to me.  I do, however want  lights (front and back) that are sufficiently bright during the day to be seen from a fair distance, say 100/200 meters away.  What lumen count should i be looking at, and is it different from front (white) light vs a red back light?  I am trying to minimise size and bulk without compromising safety.

thanks

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Most lumen claims are inflated , lens quality is a bigger factor imo 

 

Front I'm not to sure 

 

Rear go for the Bontager flare RT , its backed up fantastically and scores very high in most tests where its present. 

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2 minutes ago, BaGearA said:

Most lumen claims are inflated , lens quality is a bigger factor imo 

 

Front I'm not to sure 

 

Rear go for the Bontager flare RT , its backed up fantastically and scores very high in most tests where its present. 

This

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Agree with the previous posts.

 

Also have a look at the battery life on "flash mode".

 

The OLDER Bontrager range lasts more than 8 hours on flash mode, if you are planning longer rides.

 

The NEW Bontrager lights (at least some of them) have an AUTO day/night setting ... increasing the flash intensity during the day, and reducing the battery to a mere 3 hours.

 

With front ligths the battery duration is linked to the "flash setting".  A fast bright flash drains the the battery in a few hours, while a slower flash lasts more than 8 hours.

 

Also try to see how the light fits to the bike, and what it will take to remove it to charge.  I now rather charge the front light on the bike, even though the cabling is a bit of schelp,

 

 

 

PS - saw the Varia in action this weekend.  Steady light, and when a vehicle approached it started flashing.  Back to a steady light once the vehicle was past.

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Lumens wise you dont need much, for the front anything around the 200lm is fine. You just want to make sure its got both flash and constant modes (at max lumen) and that the run time at max exceeds your planned riding times.

For the rear 75lm is more than enough, again, as above, check run time @max lumen flash mode.

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2 hours ago, BaGearA said:

Most lumen claims are inflated , lens quality is a bigger factor imo 

 

Front I'm not to sure 

 

Rear go for the Bontager flare RT , its backed up fantastically and scores very high in most tests where its present. 

Bontrager Flare RT rear and Bontrager Ion in front, fantastic combo...have been using them for years and they integrate with Garmin and other GPS units...

Front lights are WAY more important than rear lights in daytime riding...read the studies....

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Just now, guidodg said:

Bontrager Flare RT rear and Bontrager Ion in front, fantastic combo...have been using them for years and they integrate with Garmin and other GPS units...

Front lights are WAY more important than rear lights in daytime riding...read the studies....

my experience tells me otherwise.

when i dont have the flashing rear on I find cars pass me a lot closer than when i do have it on.

 

Since getting lights, i never ride without them (except for races). So when the rear does go flat because I've forgotten to charge it, i notice right away how cars pass me closer

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lumens is not the only thing to look at, beam pattern is a big factor when comparing lights and how much "useful light" you actually get.

 

 

 

if you really want people to see you from behind in the dark, combine whatever red light you get with this upgrade.

 

shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcQjj-JZylllAtdDBczDpXRdDJD6GtYD8W4n0hbKl6KbTbZy9cYbsb46pVuZdb12WUmncKUukBo-BS7Qu31m65NI7f5AqWvVSyV-CIdtiVKn4xxuOT8U-fWx6knMuT3vpdK_qVA3fh9bCQ&usqp=CAc

put it on seatpost/chainstay/helmet/ and even on pedal shaft. 

 

no battery charging required.

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Varia at the top of the list, but if you're not up for a R 4k light the Blackburn Dayblazer 65 is another good option. 65lm is well bright enough to be seen in daylight on flashing mode, and it's got a less aggressive mode for early morning bunch rides so your mates can still see where they're going.

Front light - anything over about 500lm with a flash and decent side spread on the beam will do. Bonus points if it's got a Gopro mount so you can fit it under your GPS. The front needs to be brighter because white light is less visible in daylight than red.

 

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