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Stripped 8mm allen key bolt (hole)


Reg Lizard
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Ok so I tried removing my look keo carbon road bike pedals with my 8mm allen key socket bit but I only managed to strip the hole where the allen key fits. And yes I did turn it the right way to loosen it and also soaked it with Q20 :thumbup: It would appear that the thread of the pedal has seized in the crank arm. :( How this happened is a mistery to me as I greased the pedal threads about 6-8 months ago. The left pedal came off with no hassles at all :thumbup:

 

So is it possible to loosen the pedal without having to drill the thing out?

 

Thanx

Edited by Reg Lizard
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Sitting with almost a similar problem...I have a failing allen bolt on my bike...just waiting for it to let me down (not yet!!)

 

Bummer

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Get a spline socket fractionally larger then the stripped hole .Hammer it into the stripped allen key opening,support the other side of the crank arm on something solid(wood or rubber mat).The impact of the hammering should help loosen up the seized threads and once the spline is hammered in you can turn the stripped allen key bolt out.Use a light hammer not a 4LB!!!

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Keo is round with no place for a wrench

All you need is a vice and grinder (and a steady hand), as well as a range of flat spanner sizes. Who knows what size you will end up with?)

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Try using a decent vice grip (Gedore or similar. Not the cheap k@k that comes in a plastic suitcase from Game) I had a similar problem with a Crank Bros pedal (Also round on the outside.

 

Take the crank arm off. support the underside one something soft but stable (ie wood) Get somebody to hold it steady. Hit the back of the pedal shaft hard to crack the seized thread (The part where the socket is stripped). Use penetrating fluid to soak if that doesn't work. Hit it again. Be careful not to bend the crank arm!! Use the vice grip to grab the shaft and turn it the right way!!!

 

If that doesn't work, cut the pedal shaft off, drill it and use an easy out. If you can't do that ask a reputable engineering shop to get it out. I say reputable because somebody that welds gates won't be as careful with your stuff as somebody that machines moulds ;)

 

Good Luck

Edited by Grebel
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Before you start hammering away, try heating it up to break the bond, and I dont mean with an acetylene torch :D just immerse it in a bath of boiling water and keep the water boiling for a few minutes, wait until the crank is hot to the touch and then try loosen it again, it may take a few heating attempts but it will eventually break the bond.

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Before you start hammering away, try heating it up to break the bond, and I dont mean with an acetylene torch :D just immerse it in a bath of boiling water and keep the water boiling for a few minutes, wait until the crank is hot to the touch and then try loosen it again, it may take a few heating attempts but it will eventually break the bond.

 

But will that not expand the metal in the pedal aswell?

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But will that not expand the metal in the pedal aswell?

 

Marginally maybe, might also depend on the differant metals, but we used heat all the time to free bonded nuts in the work shop, granted we used an acetylene or a blowtorch but I dont think that will be advisable on a nice chromed surface :D hence I suggest boiling water which wont get the same temp. but wont damage the product. I think it may work, you may need to boil the crank a bit, try turn the stud, boil it a bit more, try again but it wont do as much damage as hammering away could POSSIBLY cause.

Edited by GrumpyOldGuy
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