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  1. https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10225523854509180&id=1411295929&sfnsn=scwspmo
  2. Hi - further details to follow, but my mate Brett managed to evade an attempted Bike Jacking EARLIER TODAY, uphill section approaching Simtswinkel corner, that gravel parking lot, I would guess 200m - 300m before that parking lot, bugger hiding in the bushes...more detail to follow as I get it. (interesting, Brett is a friend of Andrew who got bike jacked TWICE... both avoid Ocean View Corner, and now getting (attempted) bike jacking near Smitswinkel - where will it all end?) Cheers Chris
  3. I was riding this morning and noticed this group of riders had stopped at the top of Suikerbossie in a big bunch. The effect was that all the cyclists coming past were being pushed into traffic to pass them. This is essentially a blind rise and a couple of the bikes came very close to the passing cars. I’m not trying to single out Team Pure Savage (who are in this photo) as there are other groups I’ve seen doing the same. This is also a relatively small group as some of the groups stop in such large size that they cross the yellow line themselves - leaving even less space to pass. Please can we ask all groups to try be more aware of the potential risk you are placing other cyclists if you don't both pull to the side before stopping and then stopping in single file. Another potential solution is to just stop slightly further down the other side of the hill - so that that traffic has more time to see and react to those cyclists having to pull into the lane to pass the group. I’m sure no cyclist would intentionally want to put another cyclist at risk - so I thought it might just be a case of them not being aware of thIs impact on others.
  4. Hi everyone. I thought we could make an informative thread about how to secure your home. Things in the Western Cape are escalating and quickly catching up to the crime levels of Gauteng. This has raised concerns over how to secure your home and premises. So. Let's create a poll for what you prefer to use and what you have found to work and those things that don't work. I think most people have the basic in-door alarm system with burglar bars of some sort and maybe a few security gates to covers doors or passages. What I think most people are more interested in is how to secure your home and premises above and beyond the basics. Please message any items/tech I have forgotten to add. Then in the comments section it would be nice if you guys/girls could mention some specific products/dealers/websites that you recommend. To keep this more clear, please add a Location if necessary. Let's try and keep spam to a minimum? I think a lot of people are looking for advice, dealerships and expected cost of installation so let's try and help people with something informative. Lekker lekker.
  5. BH60SE Road Cycle Helmet What do you worry about most when you ride out to meet your friends on a Sunday morning? Not how many Strava trophies you’ll get, or who will be first over the morning’s steepest climb. Not whether you’ll get a puncture, and certainly not whether your local coffee shop will have stock of almond croissants. No, if you’re one of South Africa’s estimated 40 000 recreational road cyclists, chances are you worry most about being hit by a car. Your anxiety is not unfounded. The most recent statistic from the Road Traffic Management Corporation is scary enough to make you hang up your bike and never ride it again: In 2016, 451 cyclists were killed on South Africa’s roads, and it seems that the situation hasn’t improved much since then. But you’re not going to hang up your bike. You’re going to keep on riding, because little else compares to the sense of all-round satisfaction that your Sunday ride delivers. What you can do is invest in gear that will decrease the chance of a serious accident. Research has highlighted three key factors: wearing a helmet, visibility on the road and limiting rider distractions. The new Livall BH60SE ticks all of those boxes in one sleek, stylish package. It’s a smart helmet with extraordinary features that will redefine the way you think about cycling safety. BH62 Road Bike Helmet Light it up There are three rows of integrated LED lights on the back of the helmet. You can set these lights to flash, alerting motorists to your presence, or you can control the lower two rows using the wireless handlebar remote and signal your intentions when you’re about to make a turn. Crash alertConnect the helmet to your smartphone via the Livall app, and a designated contact will receive a message and a GPS location in the event of a crash. This warning is triggered by a three-axis gyroscope built into the helmet, which senses harsh impact or sudden deceleration. There’s also an SOS button: Push it for five seconds and an alert will be sent to your emergency contact. Easy communicationWith a built-in Bluetooth speaker above each ear, you can safely listen to music or turn-by-turn navigation while you ride, without affecting your spatial awareness. You can also have a phone conversation, thanks to the wind-proof microphone that muffles audio interference at speeds of up to 60km/h. If any other members of your cycling group have a Livall helmet, you can even chat to them using walkie-talkie function. Handy if you get dropped! It’s also a pretty great helmet…Smart tech aside, the BH60SE offers all the protection your brain deserves. It’s made from EPS foam and meets all mandated international safety standards. The aerodynamic design looks great, and the 24 vents offer excellent ventilation. Amazingly, Livall has managed to keep the weight to only 278g, marginally more than the energy bar in your jersey pocket. BH62 Road Helmet | BH60SE Road HelmetThe range also includes a kids’ helmet, a mountain bike helmet and a cool urban helmet for commuting, all of which feature Livall’s award-winning smart safety features. For more information, visit us at www.livall.co.za Facebook | Instagram | YouTube Download the free Livall Riding app and start tracking your performance data* Android | iOs *Livall helmet not required
  6. This is a call from those of us that share trails. Whether they’re the ones we’ve both paid for in entrance fees, or just on our local off-road paths, both are applicable. My plea is for the re-introduction of calls from cyclists. Just a simple call of ‘behind’, ‘pass left’ or ‘pass right’ or whatever works in the moment. 9 out of 10 times we will hear brakes, gravel moving, or talking coming up from behind, but those of you that have run before will know that our minds are probably in a dark place, or far far away, or perhaps even enjoying it, but the point is if runners do not hear you coming, it just makes for all parties to get frustrated and inconvenienced. I have no problem steeping aside from a piece of single track if I know you’re coming steaming up behind me. I’m sure (I hope) no trail runners expect you to head off through the bushes and thorns to go around a runner occupying the path. If it’s a double-lane track then perhaps just a confirmation on which side you are just so that everyone is on the same page and the runner doesn’t catch a surprise and dart in front of the bike. Perhaps this is just an illustration of the rise in noobs in mtb riding (which is not a bad thing), in which case we really could do with the old guard dispensing with some education. With love – your friendly trail runner
  7. Dear Hubbers A student here looking for some commuting, route and safety advice. I’m very interested in commuting daily with the road bike, from Durbanville to Stellenbosch, and back. In the mornings I’ll leave at 07:00 and get there at 08:00, and in the afternoons I can ride back at ~12/1 or on some days 4pm, depending on classes. I’m considering 3 route options, and that’s where I want to ask what you think will be safest. Safety (with regards to getting hit by a car, as well as being attacked/mugged by a person) is my biggest concern, and the only thing holding me back. 1st option is Bottelary road and then the R304 into Stellenbosch, past Kayamandi. That last part is obviously my main concern, but maybe at 8am, with cars sitting in traffic there, it might be okay? Or is that some false security? And maybe avoid this route in the afternoons, if there is little traffic? 2nd option is also Bottelary road, but then taking Kromme Rhee to the R44, and past Cloetesville into Stellenbosch, to avoid Kayamandi. I just don’t know if Kromme Rhee is a good idea with lots of cars in the morning…I’ve had some of my closest passes there, not fun. But maybe a good afternoon return route, with less traffic? 3rd option is Polkadraai road (after taking that new road past Zevenwacht to get to Polkadraai). Similar distance, but the more hilly route should take a bit longer. But like I said, I’d rather ride 10 minutes longer than not arrive there at all.. I’ve linked the routes below if you want to have a closer look or make a better suggestion. Lastly, route options aside, would you do it, or allow your son to do it, from a safety aspect? I really want to at least try it during the summer time, to save money on petrol and car maintenance, save the frustration of traffic, and get some good training in at the same time. But I obviously realise that none of that is worth it if you’re risking your health or life.. I look forward to hear your opinions, thanks! ----- Route links: Bottelary route: (https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Tyger+Valley+Shopping+Centre,+Willie+Van+Schoor+Drive,+Bellville+Park,+Cape+Town/-33.8775771,18.6826083/-33.9041575,18.699289/Stellenbosch+University,+Stellenbosch+Central,+Stellenbosch/@-33.9024175,18.6797014,12z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m16!4m15!1m5!1m1!1s0x1dcc50ba223f9d4d:0x37df01cc2657c7c3!2m2!1d18.6350371!2d-33.8735434!1m0!1m0!1m5!1m1!1s0x1dcdb2432e9fe5d1:0xcb41c6b0379331f3!2m2!1d18.864447!2d-33.9328078!3e0) Kromme Rhee route: (https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Tyger+Valley+Shopping+Centre,+Willie+Van+Schoor+Drive,+Bellville+Park,+Cape+Town/-33.8775771,18.6826083/-33.9041575,18.699289/-33.8676453,18.848498/Stellenbosch+University,+Stellenbosch+Central,+Stellenbosch/@-33.9000289,18.6797014,12z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m17!4m16!1m5!1m1!1s0x1dcc50ba223f9d4d:0x37df01cc2657c7c3!2m2!1d18.6350371!2d-33.8735434!1m0!1m0!1m0!1m5!1m1!1s0x1dcdb2432e9fe5d1:0xcb41c6b0379331f3!2m2!1d18.864447!2d-33.9328078!3e0) Polkadraai route: (https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Tyger+Valley+Shopping+Centre,+Willie+Van+Schoor+Drive,+Bellville+Park,+Cape+Town/-33.8775771,18.6826083/-33.9509485,18.7097798/Stellenbosch+University,+Stellenbosch+Central,+Stellenbosch/@-33.9174227,18.6797014,12z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m16!4m15!1m5!1m1!1s0x1dcc50ba223f9d4d:0x37df01cc2657c7c3!2m2!1d18.6350371!2d-33.8735434!1m0!1m0!1m5!1m1!1s0x1dcdb2432e9fe5d1:0xcb41c6b0379331f3!2m2!1d18.864447!2d-33.9328078!3e0)
  8. Dear Hubbers A student here looking for some commuting, route and safety advice. I’m very interested in commuting daily with the road bike, from Durbanville to Stellenbosch, and back. In the mornings I’ll leave at 07:00 and get there at 08:00, and in the afternoons I can ride back at ~12/1 or on some days 4pm, depending on classes. I’m considering 3 route options, and that’s where I want to ask what you think will be safest. Safety (with regards to getting hit by a car, as well as being attacked/mugged by a person) is my biggest concern, and the only thing holding me back. 1st option is Bottelary road and then the R304 into Stellenbosch, past Kayamandi. That last part is obviously my main concern, but maybe at 8am, with cars sitting in traffic there, it might be okay? Or is that some false security? And maybe avoid this route in the afternoons, if there is little traffic? 2nd option is also Bottelary road, but then taking Kromme Rhee to the R44, and past Cloetesville into Stellenbosch, to avoid Kayamandi. I just don’t know if Kromme Rhee is a good idea with lots of cars in the morning…I’ve had some of my closest passes there, not fun. But maybe a good afternoon return route, with less traffic? 3rd option is Polkadraai road (after taking that new road past Zevenwacht to get to Polkadraai). Similar distance, but the more hilly route should take a bit longer. But like I said, I’d rather ride 10 minutes longer than not arrive there at all.. I’ve linked the routes below if you want to have a closer look or make a better suggestion. Lastly, route options aside, would you do it, or allow your son to do it, from a safety aspect? I really want to at least try it during the summer time, to save money on petrol and car maintenance, save the frustration of traffic, and get some good training in at the same time. But I obviously realise that none of that is worth it if you’re risking your health or life.. I look forward to hear your opinions, thanks! ----- Route links: Bottelary route: (https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Tyger+Valley+Shopping+Centre,+Willie+Van+Schoor+Drive,+Bellville+Park,+Cape+Town/-33.8775771,18.6826083/-33.9041575,18.699289/Stellenbosch+University,+Stellenbosch+Central,+Stellenbosch/@-33.9024175,18.6797014,12z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m16!4m15!1m5!1m1!1s0x1dcc50ba223f9d4d:0x37df01cc2657c7c3!2m2!1d18.6350371!2d-33.8735434!1m0!1m0!1m5!1m1!1s0x1dcdb2432e9fe5d1:0xcb41c6b0379331f3!2m2!1d18.864447!2d-33.9328078!3e0) Kromme Rhee route: (https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Tyger+Valley+Shopping+Centre,+Willie+Van+Schoor+Drive,+Bellville+Park,+Cape+Town/-33.8775771,18.6826083/-33.9041575,18.699289/-33.8676453,18.848498/Stellenbosch+University,+Stellenbosch+Central,+Stellenbosch/@-33.9000289,18.6797014,12z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m17!4m16!1m5!1m1!1s0x1dcc50ba223f9d4d:0x37df01cc2657c7c3!2m2!1d18.6350371!2d-33.8735434!1m0!1m0!1m0!1m5!1m1!1s0x1dcdb2432e9fe5d1:0xcb41c6b0379331f3!2m2!1d18.864447!2d-33.9328078!3e0) Polkadraai route: (https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Tyger+Valley+Shopping+Centre,+Willie+Van+Schoor+Drive,+Bellville+Park,+Cape+Town/-33.8775771,18.6826083/-33.9509485,18.7097798/Stellenbosch+University,+Stellenbosch+Central,+Stellenbosch/@-33.9174227,18.6797014,12z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m16!4m15!1m5!1m1!1s0x1dcc50ba223f9d4d:0x37df01cc2657c7c3!2m2!1d18.6350371!2d-33.8735434!1m0!1m0!1m5!1m1!1s0x1dcdb2432e9fe5d1:0xcb41c6b0379331f3!2m2!1d18.864447!2d-33.9328078!3e0)
  9. https://m.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/cape-town-mountain-biker-assaulted-stabbed-for-his-bike-20190205 Apologies if double post. THIS HAS GOT TO STOP!
  10. Hi Hubbers Two of our friends were attacked and assaulted yesterday afternoon on the Jonkershoek road. The driver made a U turn and tried to run over the cyclists with his vehicle. Thereafter he stopped and took a stick object and beat them up. Then another car stopped and 3 guys helped the driver beat up the cyclists further. (The driver apparently said "the road does not belong to us etc". The one cyclist took a video of the incident. A case has been opened at SAPS, PPA Legal and attorney was contacted. Be safe.
  11. I work in an area with a fair amount of bike lanes, and 10 times out of 10 there are cars parked in said bike lanes. The days that I commute involve sticking to the bike lanes, looking over my shoulder, passing a parked car etc etc. My question is, what are the consequences if I were to plow into a car parked in a bike lane? The car shouldn't be there so I can only assume that their insurance wont pay out, but then again I shouldn't be plowing into parked cars. Who is liable for what and should I build a bike with an indestructible front wheel, invest in riot gear and go riding? This could have waited til Friday I know...
  12. Interesting ramblings on Outside Online. I have always been a fan of remove all safety labels and let nature sift out the s*** but this guy has a few key points, like if you are not interested in driving you will not do it well and will be dangerous. The counter is no one wants their wife and Kids in a dangerous car with no airbags. We klapped a Kudu on the N3 at 120km/h earlier this year and can say the only reason am still alive and walked away literally without a scratch was due to the car's safety features. So it is a lovely ideology but practice would be a different kettle of fish. https://www.outsideonline.com/2360451/make-driving-dangerous-again
  13. A release from the Mountain Club to all users fo Table Mountain. While angled at hikers it has relevance to all users especially for the Newlands Forest, Rhodes, Signal Hill areas. Mountain Club SA (Cape Town section) WARNING, OCT '18 The General Committee of the Mountain Club of South Africa (Cape Town Section) regrets to advise members of the increasing possible threats to their personal safety while hiking and climbing in and around the Table Mountain National Park, and elsewhere. WARNING: Regarding violent crime on Table Mountain and Peninsula hiking areas The Club urges members to exercise caution when planning hiking routes. There are currently very few areas that can be considered completely safe, and you are advised to be aware of areas that have seen a recent escalation in crime. The recent series of assaults on trail runners & hikers on the Saddle at the top of Newlands Ravine, as well as on walkers, hikers, runners and cyclists in Newlands forest, represent a significant shift in the level of violence involved, unfortunately similar to that of the tragic attacks in the Kalk Bay and Karbonkelberg areas earlier this year. The MCSA (Cape Town Section) is integrally involved with the Table Mountain Security Action Group (TMSAG), an initiative involving over forty mountain user groups, neighbourhood watches and security associations, who are pursuing positive actions behind the scenes to combat these hazards in very difficult circumstances. The TMSAG is actively lobbying ALL the authorities to come up with a meaningful plan to protect mountain users – locals, visitors and tourists alike – and to apprehend those who would threaten us in what should be a safe and peaceful environment. High-risk areas Newlands Forest in its entirety, Newlands Ravine, the Saddle behind Devil’s Peak, the slopes of Devil’s Peak, the Blockhouses and nearby mountain biking trails. All these areas have seen several assaults recently, and while some of the perpetrators have, of late, been apprehended, others remain at large. There are also reports of people living there, hence the increased risks. Other areas considered to pose a risk to safety Signal Hill and Lion’s Head, Noordhoek & Kommetjie Beach, Sandy Bay & Karbonkelberg, Vlakkenberg, Blackburn Ravine, Elephant’s Eye, Kleinplaas Dam area, Black Hill and Red Hill, Slangkop, Peer’s Cave and Sunrise Beach. Safer areas Currently these include Silvermine East and the Kalk Bay mountains, where there have been fewer reports of incidents of late, while Cape Point, Silvermine West, the Back Table, Orange Kloof and the Apostles remain relatively crime-free at the present time. Vehicle break-ins A significant increase in the number of vehicle break-ins is occurring at the end of Tafelberg Road, at the Rhodes Memorial parking areas and on Signal Hill Road. Mountain users should remember that crime shifts in response to increased security in an area pushing the perpetrators to somewhere else. It is unlikely that the Table Mountain National Park will ever be totally crime free.. The best thing you can do is to be aware, keep hiking and look after your own safety. SAFETY STRATEGIES Hike in a group. While this does not preclude being attacked, it may serve as a deterrent. Be aware of potential threats. The suddenness of an attack leads to panic, which may exacerbate the situation. An alert, obviously aware group, poses a harder target. If attacked, it is advisable NOT to resist. Handing over your “valuables” decreases the chances of being harmed (although unfortunately, this is not always the case). In the event that you can see that an attack is imminent, hide your cellphone in the vegetation or rocks, so that you are able to summon help much faster afterwards. Keep the emergency contact numbers on your phones. Check that all members of the party have these numbers. Also keep those numbers somewhere on your person. Keep a look out on social media for the various ‘Safe Hikes’ and ‘Take Back Our Mountain’ initiatives, in which the MCSA is an active participant, and lend your support. These are proving to be highly successful. Emergency numbers (for crime or accident situations) 021 937 0300 Metro Emergency Medical Services, who will activate Mountain Rescue, and have the ability to escalate your call to all relevant agencies. 021 480 7700 Public Emergency Communication Centre, which is central control for reporting crime, on the mountain or anywhere else. These control centres can easily communicate with each other and all emergency services, and are currently your best options. It is utterly unacceptable that we are forced to endure the threat of violence while enjoying our mountains and beaches. The MCSA is striving, along with many other mountain user groups, to do whatever we can to combat crime, keep up pressure on the authorities, and to work towards evolving solutions to improve safety. The MCSA (Cape Town Section) 11 October 2018
  14. Hi fellow Hubbers. Next week Im travelling to Barrydale on Route 62 and was want to ride out to Montegue. Just checking if anyone is out that side and keen to join as I'm a bit nervous doing that on my ace on the open highway! I have only don this route for the DC and was keen to do it as a training ride. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Have a lekker Friday all. !
  15. There were reports of multiple muggings and incidents in Groenkloof Nature Reserve earlier in the year. Does anyone know if something was done about it? I haven't read about any more incidents. Does anyone here frequent the reserve?
  16. http://www.climbing.co.za/2015/09/cyclist-mugged-below-rhodes-memorial/ "A cyclist (who also happens to be a climber) was mugged and relieved of his bicycle below Rhodes Memorial. Below is an account from the cyclist: Around 15:30 on Sunday the 13th of September I rode across the M3 bridge at Mostert’s Mill, and went through the rotating gate intending to cycle up to Rhodes Memorial. There was a group of hikers about 100m ahead of me walking up. Two men ran through the group (hence I did not see them coming). One man headed straight to me. He had a gun, which he made visible to me as he ran towards me. He ordered me to get off off the bike and his partner took it. He then ordered me to take off my watch and helmet which he took. He asked for my phone which was not on me. He told me I has lying, and I told him to search me, which he did not do. He then ran down towards the gate and I think they split up. I walked down after him, he was adjusting the seat, and then shouted at me to run up the mountain in the opposite direction, which I did not do. He then rode across the bridge and away. Fortunately I was not hurt in any way. I did not retaliate at any point, but I was tempted to shout to the hiking group (that were ahead of me) but not while he was holding a gun. I reported the muggins to the police immediately at the Mowbray police station and have registered a case. See below a photo from the internet of the bike and colour scheme which was stolen." http://www.climbing.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/GT-A-1_table_mountain_bike_mugging.jpg
  17. To my fellow cyclists out on our roads daily. I am concerned for your safety as well as mine. Every time, with out fail, in fact our group has started joking about it already and counting the amount of times we missed "near death" all thanks to an Uber driver. They stop anywhere along the road to drop off, collect or just sight seeing.They simply just turn into traffic any where and any timeThey open their doors to collect or drop off customers...without warning.They don't apologize, they don't even care! So i ask this question! Do they know people cycle and do their side and or rear view mirrors block us out?
  18. So I have let on snippets about this and I have edited a few bits out but guys here are a few considerations on geospatial information in the form of my ineloquent ramblings on things I have noticed. I am happy to be corrected and for stuff to be added as well... Social media has engulfed the world and although there are many trying to avoid it as much as possible, our digital profiles are still present and more and more they are becoming linked, creating and combining data about us, some of that data is spatial. It is up to us to become aware about this data in order to protect ourselves because even though there are privacy policies implemented there is still data out there that can be helpful but can also be harmful. As a Geospatial Analyst my career specializes in asking the question: Where? GIS software and data is used to map and model space, identify locations, routes, terrain and analyze anything with a location. We can target markets spatially and identify potential shop, service and infrastructure locations. From this outlook and skillset we see spatial information very differently to most and with this there are key positive and negative safety points identified. The Google maps app has recently added a function where you can share your mobile device’s location with others for a set amount of time. This is an incredibly useful function and already many use it to monitor their children’s locations or as an ICE (In Case of Emergency) function when travelling or exercising alone. The android interconnectivity also means that one can track an android device linked to the google account via the online Google account management page. This is similar to the find my IPhone app which has seen success retrieving stolen goods locally on a number of occasions. The Google maps and Waze traffic function is a triumph in sharing of spatial information. Locations and current speed of mobile phones moving on public roads is used to give live traffic updates. Allowing Google to access this information is key to having good quality live traffic data. Waze is also at the cutting edge of location based advertising which targets people with adverts only when they are passing by close to the location of a service, this is a streamline method of advertising which accurately targets the clientele. Some of the sport GPS watches and devices such as the Garmin Cycling devices can be paired with a mobile device and this allows them to share a location during exercise for safety however now with the location sharing within Google maps this safety feature is redundant as you would have to run a mobile device anyway. Knowing the location of your mobile device can also come with a whole host of risks. ‘checking in’ at places regularly can build routines which can be a foot in the door for crime knowing someone is always at gym or having coffee at a certain time allows for others to know you are not home or that you are going to be travelling a certain route whilst being tired from a gym session etc. The risk there is not just for crime but this spatial information is a treasure trove for stalkers following their victims. If you are being stalked the likelihood of you clamping down on publically shared information is already high, but remember to focus on the spatial aspect of this information, your home and current location may be easier to trace than you would like to believe. Notable spatial information that you can think is harmless is that supplied from Tinder, the online dating app, where a distance another app user is from you is provided. This may be harmless seeing as it could be in any direction, but much like the triangulation of a GPS position it would take just three readings to narrow down your location. The map below explains this using dummy data. By restarting the app in 3 different locations, 3 recordings for the distance to another app user were recorded. From this a circle is drawn from each point, with the recorded distance to the app user as the radius for the circle. Where the three circles intersect is the location of the other app user. This is a risk as someone can pinpoint your location to a small area again putting you at potential risk. The Facebook app for mobile use has a ‘friends near by’ function which alerts you when you have facebook friends within a certain radius, and while this is convenient for impromptu catch up sessions there is a lot to consider in terms of who knows exactly where you are. Other apps such as Strava, Garmin Connect and Suunto’s Movescount have built in safety features to allow you to hide your sport activities. Strava also has a privacy zone where any activity within a certain radius of your house or office is hidden from others so that people cannot identify the location of your home. This is important seeing as many cycle from home and there is a large increase in bicycle theft. Strava’s Segments or online races over short sections of track or road can easily be used to identify people who may have multiple high end bikes like strong or professional athletes. Some also list the equipment they used so you can approximate the value of the bicycle in question. Using the link to their account you could then use other activities on their training log to pinpoint their home location for a break in. With the value of certain high end bicycles setting a privacy zone is definitely worth doing. The Strava segments are also an admission of guilt for many law breaking athletes, there are segments which people are regularly racing on stretches of road where cycling and running is illegal and GPS data indicating people breaking the speed limits in areas. One segment alone has over 766 people having recorded times cycling in an illegal place in South Africa. Strava segments are also on public roads and putting others and yourself in danger running stop streets in order to claim a KOM is also risky, the use of GPS data for real time racing is also flawed in that the GPS data is stored in plain text and can be altered. So your KOM could have claimed the time and have never even run or cycled the segment. So while segments are great motivation for training it is wise to take into other considerations when charging for that KOM. Suunto, who make high end sport devices have an online portal which records their training data, and the default setting is public, so your training an movements are by default fully visible to anyone with internet activity. Other portals are set to hidden as default but it is worth checking no matter where you store or log your training. Twitter and Instagram are also valuable sources of spatial information and filtering these streams of data allow us GIS professionals to identify where people are posting about certain things, this is useful in market identification and monitoring trends. As with most social media it is important to control the public access to personal information and spatial information is no different so take a moment and review what spatial information you are sharing. Sharing within limit is perfectly safe and there is no reason to hide your training from close friends and family or trainers the same way your input into traffic will only make your estimated times more accurate or the way your tweet locations could possibly help someone provide you a service better one day. But be aware who has access to this data and what their end goal is with the data, a bit of common sense can go a long way.
  19. Hi guys Any suggestions regarding a decent 20-40km mtb cycling trail (+-1000m elevation) around Somerset West area? I am currently looking at the Helderberg farm mtb route for the weekend (29&30 July) Any info on the safety of the various routes on offer in the area? I get the feeling Schapenberg mtb trails are not safe due to its location. If anyone is keen to ride with me on the weekend or invite me to ride with their group will be great. Start ride after permits bough approximately 08h30. Alternative option is to drive through and cycle at Jonkershoek. *Johan
  20. Hi Capetonians, Bit of a back story: After having car written off, now a full time commuter to work, trip is from Foreshore to Claremont via Woodstock. Been doing it for almost three months and have had to contend with glass and people parking in bike lane, being under 30 I just moaned on twitter and got a some likes and rewteets. Not much changed. Last week the Cape Town city alerts lodged the complaints for me on their site and the glass has been cleaned on the section I reported. I then went and looked at the how process to submit an issue. Its really simple and rather quick. Having talked to a ward councilor, he was saying that it basically comes down to the issues with the most requests gets the money and time spent on it. So as well as reporting on twitter etc, so every week if their are cars parked in the lane, glass, pot holes or any other issue i will make lodge the complaint. Point of this thread: Keep track of all the service requests and complaints, so we can get the cycle lanes safer for cyclists. If too busy to report - you can send a PM with location, issue, cell phone number and I will submit for you Here is how to do it: Click on this link: https://eservices1.capetown.gov.za/coct/wapl/zsreq_app/index.html Click on create service request: Click on what you want to report - Either street sweeping/parking Add a location so they no where to action your request: You can even add a selfie (No please dont, just a pic of car in the lane/glass) * You do not need a photo Then just add your contact deets so they can contact you and know you are not some random bot: If we can start reporting this regularly the city can start doing things about it. Stay Savage!
  21. So I came upon this news article... Oh my vark! edit - spelling http://www.nola.com/crime/index.ssf/2017/05/bicyclist_shot_new_orleans_sat.html
  22. Hey guys, Today I went to pick up my bike from This Way Out and I was amazed how many cyclist I saw without helmets. Yeah, they are not in Tygerberg MTB Club or any other, but still... It is like riding a car without a safety belt. This one oke was driving on Fairtrees Rd (16:15) with medium traffic without a helmet. Best of all, he was driving an XTC Advanced 29er 2 LTD. Surely he can afford a helmet. There is also a dirt path which he could have followed instead of being on the road with cars flying by. I do not want to rant, but I am pretty stretch about wearing a helmet and will always be. No matter what the scenario. Heck, I even wear my helmet when visiting my friend in a residential area about 1km away. No Helmet No Ride
  23. Good morning all in Hubland, Reading through some recent threads, it seems that a few cyclists get very upset with "wheel suckers", people who effectively trail behind a cyclist ahead of him/her in a race situation. Now, when you are riding/racing in the more intense batches (vets, A, B etc.), riders have different goals. More often than not, one just wants to finish with the bunch as an example. The only way to do that is to either suck wheel, or to be so powerful that you drag the bunch from start to finish. I'd like to say that this split is 80/20 in favour of the "wheel suckers". What I anticipate the biggest gripe to be are the "wheels suckers" taking advantage near the end of the race, sprinting by and taking the win. Why are people so upset by this? Why do you think that if you lead the race from start to finish you deserve the podium spot? Kudos to you if you are capable of that, but that also makes you a target for subsequent races, because then people know who to "suck dry". What if you as a "wheel sucker" are feeling surprisingly good nearing the end and feel like you can take the win? Should you out of principle stay where you were? Example: Peter Sagan won the 2015 WC by sitting in the bunch until the few kilometers and going solo until the end. Yes, his forte is sprinting, so he wants to take maximum advantage. What do other people think? PS! This is just my opinion, no need to slam mine.
  24. This was brought to our attention on Twitter. Not sure if anything has come of it but if anyone is looking for evidence, please contact Shayne on Twitter. For those blocked from Twitter by your work overlords, an image:
  25. There is currently a negative attitude with regards to the safety of cyclist on SA Roads. With various accidents, bike jackings and presumably mis-managed organizations and governmental initiatives, the overall feeling on BikeHub is that something needs to be done, but the 'what' and 'who' has not been pin pointed yet. Last weekend while cycling on the R104 shoulder from Cullinan to Pretoria, a miracle happened: A super natural force pushed me off the shoulder onto the gravel (this wasn't fatigue) just split-seconds before a drunk or inattentive driver swooped by on the shoulder of the lane @ 140 km/h. Without a doubt I would've been hit and died if it wasn't for God's intervention. The few cars behind honked their horns at the fleeing car and slowed down to ask if I was alright. A testimony of life saving miracle is always a sensitive story, as there are many other cyclists who did not have the luck which I did and either fell, got bike-jacked or collided with cars with terrible consequences. Therefore, my testimony is rather the incredible power of prayer and the effect it has had on the well-being and safety aspect of my cycling. Countless times, the grace of God protected me and putting my mind at ease as I ride next to reckless taxis, through dodgy areas and even preventing me getting aggressive with the hooligans on the road. Dedicated cycling lanes, carrying pepper-spray, flashing lights and bumper stickers reduce cycling risks but don't act on the problem: People's hearts. That is where God and our prayers come in: God is the only One that can act supernaturally on peoples hearts, in weird and wonderful ways. And they don't even have to make a conscious decision to change; it can be enforced by the prayers of anyone believing their prayers will be answered. I would like to encourage all Christians to pray the following once, before every ride or even daily:Pray for your and all other cyclist's safety, for sound decision making, for calmness and that you will again appreciate the ability to do this wonderful sport. There is a nice book called Prayer of Protection by Joseph Prince.Pray for all drivers and other road users, their safety, their awareness and patience when encountering a cyclist or group ride.Pray for the government, PPA/CSA and SANRAL for guidance and a willingness to make the roads safer for everyone.Pray for your family to be safe while you are out on the road or trails and also to give them assurance of your safe return.I would appreciate if this thread can become a collection of testimonies by people who encountered Godly miracles, to enlighten others about the power of our wonderful God. And also a timeline tipping point where the cycling accidents on our roads decrease (even though it is cycling peak season). If there are any questions, please post on the thread or pm me. I hope that it would be very beneficial or at least bring a positive outlook to the situation of SA roads. Have a blessed weekend.
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