Jump to content

Normal heart rate?


Nicomrs
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi all, i have a problem with my heart rate, during a ride i quickly go over 170bpm avg and 185 max, dont think this is normal or is it, i do mountain biking.

 

I have compared to other guys when mine is that high and they would then be at 150bpm.

 

How do i improve this, i am very fit at the moment but this bothers me.

 

I have compared monitors but my monitor seems right.

 

I did the test on a spinning bike and really struggled to get higher than 165 wit intense intervals.

 

After that back on my mountain bike and quickly back to 175+bpm on a hill.

 

I am very confused, where does this leave me?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi all, i have a problem with my heart rate, during a ride i quickly go over 170bpm avg and 185 max, dont think this is normal or is it, i do mountain biking.

 

I have compared to other guys when mine is that high and they would then be at 150bpm.

 

How do i improve this, i am very fit at the moment but this bothers me.

 

I have compared monitors but my monitor seems right.

 

I did the test on a spinning bike and really struggled to get higher than 165 wit intense intervals.

 

After that back on my mountain bike and quickly back to 175+bpm on a hill.

 

I am very confused, where does this leave me?

 

HR is very individual (don't compare to your friends).

HR is easily affected by various outside influences (terrain, temperature, state of fitness etc etc)

 

Try find a reputable cycling coach who can perform a proper evaluation on your abilities including what your true Max HR and training zones are.

 

If you don't want to go to a coach, look online for a proper test protocol and follow it exactly. There are plenty of examples online, and most likely some will even link some to this thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can't compare yours to anybody else's. Mine is way lower than most peoples. Very difficult to get my Discovery points, if you worried I would recommend seeing a doctor maybe or atleast asking next time you need to go. 

 

FYI: Wrist rate watches are inaccurate, if I wear two one might be much higher than the other one. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heart rate is very individual as per comments above. I wouldn't worry too much about the numbers you posted if that has been your 'normal' for a while.

 

I'm over 40 and mine will go up to 210 on some rides if its a hot a day and I'm pushing up long climbs (chest strap). If I'm doing a road race it may average 180 for the ride. Its been like that for nearly 3 years and I haven't had any issues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There seems to be two differing aspects to your dilemma:

 

1. A perceived high HR compared to others on an actual ride.

2. Inability to replicate that HR on a trainer.

 

Re 1, as others have said, maybe you just have a high max HR?

 

Re 2, maybe your work intervals indoors weren't as hard as outdoors? I don't suppose you have any power readings available to use as a comparison?

 

 

 

Hi all, i have a problem with my heart rate, during a ride i quickly go over 170bpm avg and 185 max, dont think this is normal or is it, i do mountain biking.

 

I have compared to other guys when mine is that high and they would then be at 150bpm.

 

How do i improve this, i am very fit at the moment but this bothers me.

 

I have compared monitors but my monitor seems right.

 

I did the test on a spinning bike and really struggled to get higher than 165 wit intense intervals.

 

After that back on my mountain bike and quickly back to 175+bpm on a hill.

 

I am very confused, where does this leave me?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have recently tried to understand the same issue.

I am 65 and the "rough and ready" rule is that you maximum heart rate should be 220-65, in my case 155.

I go to a Cadence Cycle studio twice a week where my maximum heart rate has reached up to 178 recently. The norm is probably 168-170.

On the road my muscles give out before my heart rate hits that level so I see a max level in the low 150~165

One of the more important factors is the rate of recovery, I.e. How quickly does it drop after you reduce your effort. If it quickly drops to zero you have a problem! However it seems dropping 30~40 bpm in 2 minutes is probably a good sign.

I think the best answer will come from a proper medical professional (cardiologist or sports doctor). I did try a Vitality free health assessment but they didn't have the expertise to provide a satisfactory answer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have recently tried to understand the same issue.

I am 65 and the "rough and ready" rule is that you maximum heart rate should be 220-65, in my case 155.

I go to a Cadence Cycle studio twice a week where my maximum heart rate has reached up to 178 recently. The norm is probably 168-170.

On the road my muscles give out before my heart rate hits that level so I see a max level in the low 150~165

One of the more important factors is the rate of recovery, I.e. How quickly does it drop after you reduce your effort. If it quickly drops to zero you have a problem! However it seems dropping 30~40 bpm in 2 minutes is probably a good sign.

I think the best answer will come from a proper medical professional (cardiologist or sports doctor). I did try a Vitality free health assessment but they didn't have the expertise to provide a satisfactory answer

Very rough and not at all ready. It is a highly generalized thing, whereas true HR Max is as said numerous times above, very individual.

 

Case in point - I ran a trail run on Monday with an average (not max!) HR of 179. Max was 198. I am quite a bit over the 22 years that that would imply according to the generalized . In fact, I'm just 15 years younger than you. It is what it is - my HR Max is, was and will continue to be high.

 

Rate of recovery is a good measure of base fitness. Or lack thereof - even if fit - often indicates that you're not recovered, still ill, on antibiotics after-effects, etc. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How old are you?

How tall are you?

What is your mass?

How often do you ride? (per week)

How long(time) are your rides?

 

Where are you based?

 

all these things, and even then, it depends... we're all different.

 

My advice to the OP is to keep a note of things (Strava is a good place) and then check and compare over time. In addition, make a note of how you were feeling at the time.

 

Personally, I'm 50 and have maxed @181... any numbers after that will be punched into a phone for paramedics... 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very rough and not at all ready. It is a highly generalized thing, whereas true HR Max is as said numerous times above, very individual.

 

Case in point - I ran a trail run on Monday with an average (not max!) HR of 179. Max was 198. I am quite a bit over the 22 years that that would imply according to the generalized . In fact, I'm just 15 years younger than you. It is what it is - my HR Max is, was and will continue to be high.

 

Rate of recovery is a good measure of base fitness. Or lack thereof - even if fit - often indicates that you're not recovered, still ill, on antibiotics after-effects, etc. 

 

I agree with SeaBee.

 

My HR is similar to his, ....  I'm 49, and at a recent cycle race had an average HR of 176bpm and max HR of 197bpm. I often cycle above 190bpm. I have a proper checkup annually. My advice would be to visit your doctor, and have him clear you.  ;) Riding and being concerned about your HR, takes the fun out of it.  :) 

 

ps. I ride/train about 15 to 20 hours a week.

post-20017-0-85961600-1576673921_thumb.png

Edited by Eddie_V
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heart rate is very individual.   

When unfit in about June this year I hit 180bpm  several times during HIIT training  but as I got fitter the maximum dropped , in October  during Hi Altitude HIIT  getting over 160bpm needed real and sustained  effort.

(BTW my current age is 72 years and 6 months)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

My Profile My Forum Content My Followed Content Forum Settings Ad Messages My Ads My Favourites My Saved Alerts My Pay Deals Settings Help Logout