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  1. Ariane Luthi mentioned today on twitter that two female mountain bikers were busted for doping... Any idea who the two cyclists are?
  2. Cycling South Africa reports that Pieter Seyffert who returned an adverse analytical finding in an in-competition test conducted by the South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport(SAIDS) on 17 February 2013 has been found guilty and has received a two year ban from all sport. The analytical report confirmed the presence of the stimulant, Phentermine in his urine sample. The finding and sanction were handed down by the independent SAIDS tribunal which was held on 9 July 2013. Seyffert is suspended for a period of two years from 10 April 2013 to 9 April 2015. Click here to view the article
  3. In addition, all competitive results obtained by Seyffert from the date of collection of the positive sample, being 17 February 2013, will be disqualified with all of the resulting consequences including forfeiture of any medals, points and prizes (including prize money). Cycling South Africa respects the independence of the SAIDS process and therefore respects the outcome. Cycling South Africa further reiterates its zero-tolerance approach to doping in sport and will increase its education and awareness programmes along with SAIDS to eradicate the scourge of doping from the sport.
  4. Some of you have probably seen this on GCN earlier in the week. Just wanted to share so that you can turn the conversation on its head at the next braai when someone brings up how bad cycling is in terms of doping. It always bothered me that things like crossfit never had any doping scandals, surely a portion of those guys "Juice". Glad to see they made the list
  5. What is tramadol? Tramadol is a painkiller in the synthetic opioid category. It is frequently used by cyclists, as shown by the findings of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA)'s monitoring programme since 2012. In particular in the 2017 survey:4.4% of in‐competition tests on cyclists showed the use of tramadol; 68% of urine samples – taken from across 35 Olympic sports – containing tramadol were from cyclists. What are the side effects of Tramadol? The use of tramadol can have two types of side‐effect: nausea, drowsiness and loss of concentration (increasing the risk of race crashes), and gradual dependence on the substance with a risk of developing an addiction.Tramadol is available on prescription but is also freely available on the internet, which increases the risk of uncontrolled self‐medication. In light of the risks associated with its use in competitive cycling, and in accordance with the UCI Management Committee decision of June 2018, the UCI Medical Regulations will ban in‐competition use of tramadol. The regulations will be published on the UCI website shortly. What is the purpose of the ban? The ban is based on a desire to reduce the risk of crashes, and that of drug dependency, among riders.The new regulation will come into force on 1 March 2019. Any rider taking part in an event registered on a national or international calendar may be chosen to provide a blood sample as a test for tramadol. Testing will take place in‐competition, after races, across all disciplines and categories. This will be managed by the UCI's Medical Director, with logistical and personnel support from the Cycling Anti‐Doping Foundation (CADF). What method will be used? Dried blood droplets will be tested for the presence of Tramadol, using a high‐precision analysis technique. Positive or negative results will depend on the presence or absence of the substance in the blood (there is no threshold). The analysis will be carried out in a reference laboratory, with the results sent to the UCI Medical Director within a maximum of 4‐5 days. What are the penalties? Rider penaltiesA first offence committed by a rider will be penalised with disqualification from the event, alongside all resulting consequences (loss of medals, points and prize money). In addition, a fine of CHF5,000 will be imposed if the rider is a member of a UCI‐registered team. In all other cases, the fine will be CHF1,000. A second offence will result in disqualification from the event and a five‐month suspension. If a further offence is committed, a nine‐month suspension will be incurred. Team penalties If two riders belonging to the same UCI‐registered team commit an offence within a period of 12 months, the team will be fined CHF10,000. If a further offence is committed within the same 12‐month period, the team will be suspended for a period of between 1 and 12 months, to be determined by the UCI Disciplinary Commission.
  6. Cycling South Africa takes note of the sanction of 11 months period of ineligibility imposed by the UCI against Ms. Yolande de Villiers for the presence of the prohibited substances hydrochlorothiazide and amilorid (diuretic) found in three samples collected from the rider on 31 January, 28 February and 21 March 2015. Click here to view the article
  7. Cycling South Africa reports that Tyronne White has been found guilty of an anti-doping rule violation after an in-competition test conducted on 30 April 2016 confirmed the presence of the Glucocorticoid, Dexamethasone. Click here to view the article
  8. The SAIDS Independent Doping Hearing Panel imposed a period of ineligibility of 18 months, commencing on 14 December 2016. Mr. White is therefore suspended and prohibited from competing and administering in the sport of Cycling as well as in any other sport in South Africa and Internationally from 14 December 2016 until 13 June 2018. This decision may be appealed by Mr. White, the UCI, WADA and SAIDS. Cycling South Africa respects the independence of the SAIDS process and will respect the outcome. Cycling SA further reiterates its zero-tolerance approach to doping in sport and will continue working with SAIDS in the promotion of a drug-free sport via its awareness and extensive testing programmes.
  9. SAIDS has imposed a period of ineligibility of 2 years, commencing on 3 March 2018 until and including 2nd March 2020. Ms Buchacher is therefore suspended and prohibited from competing and administering in the sport of Cycling as well as in any other sport in South Africa and Internationally during this time. Source: Cycling South Africa.
  10. The organisation’s CEO Khalid Galant revealed that the convictions arose from “phase one of an investigation being undertaken in collaboration with the Department of Priority Crimes and Investigations (the Hawks)”. The investigation would “continue to look at athletes, medical doctors, coaches and trainers and whether they have a role in a doping supply network”. SAIDS announced that one of the three was veteran mountain biker Shan Wilson, who has been banned for six years after being found guilty on five counts. These were: The presence of a prohibited substance or its metabolites or markers in a sample; Tampering or attempted tampering with any part of the doping control process; Trafficking or attempted trafficking in any prohibited substance or prohibited method; Administration or attempted administration to any athlete in-competition or out-of-competition of any prohibited substance or prohibited method; Complicity (being involved with others in acts that are breaches of the regulations). Wilson was initially tested in-competition on March 25, 2014. This sample was negative based on the scientific, analytical protocols that were validated at that time. An investigation into the cyclist triggered a retroactive test on his stored sample utilising current analytical methods. These new methods were able to determine whether the testosterone in his sample was from an exogenous (external) source. Testosterone from an exogenous source and its metabolites were found in his system. His other charges arose from the ongoing investigation. All Wilson’s results, rankings, medals and prize money have been expunged for a period of two years from that date (March 25, 2014). His fifth place in the Grand Masters category at the 2018 Absa Cape Epic has also been removed. A prominent South African woman mountain biker was earlier banned for two years after an adverse analytical finding for EPO (Erythropoietin) when she was tested on the March 3rd this year. She was a regular podium finisher at events in the Western Cape. The third athlete, a national level cyclist, has not been named as he has appealed his four-year ban. He was charged for suspicious variations in his Athlete Biological Passport, which he could not explain to SAIDS’s satisfaction. “The investigation was triggered in significant part by whistleblowers and we are very grateful to their efforts to keep sport clean” said Galant. “We do take tip-offs about any sporting discipline or individuals seriously and encourage people with information on doping to come forward to us.”
  11. Knox is a former South African Marathon MTB champion (2012 and 2016), a three-time overall winner of the National MTB Series (2012, 2015 and 2016) and represented South Africa several times at the world cross country and marathon championships. In terms of the ruling, he will be stripped of all his titles from June 16, 2015 and will have to return all prize money, prizes and medals gained since that date. Knox’s ABP was monitored from February 2013 to June 2017. Irregularities included an artificially increased haemoglobin concentration over a period of time and bone marrow stimulation followed by immediate bone marrow suppression. The ABP was reviewed in conjunction with the cyclist’s competition schedules, race results and intelligence supplied to SAIDS. Knox’s explanations and supporting documents were rejected by the international panel as not providing explanations for the ABP changes and irregularities. Mr. Knox lodged an appeal against the initial decision, but failed to file any documentation for his appeal within the prescribed filing period. Knox is one of three mountain bikers given doping bans in the past 18 months as a result of a year-long investigation and tip-offs from whistleblowers. SAIDS’s CEO, Khalid Galant, said that the convictions arose from the first phase of an investigation being undertaken in collaboration with the Department of Priority Crimes and Investigations (the Hawks). The investigation will “continue to look at athletes, medical doctors, coaches and trainers and whether they have a role in a doping supply network”. Earlier this year SAIDS announced that one of the three mountain bikers found guilty of doping offences in the investigation was Shan Wilson, who was banned for six years after being found guilty of doping on five counts. These included: the presence of a prohibited substance or its metabolites or markers in a sample; trafficking or attempted trafficking in any prohibited substance or prohibited method; and complicity (being involved with others in acts that are breaches of the regulations). Wilson was initially tested in-competition on March 25, 2014. A female mountain biker was banned for two years after an adverse analytical finding for EPO (Erythropoietin) when she was tested on the 3rd of March this year. “The investigation was triggered in significant part by whistleblowers and we are very grateful to their efforts to keep sport clean,” said Galant. “We do take tip-offs about any sporting discipline or individuals seriously and encourage people with good information to come forward. Any information remain strictly confidential and can be submitted via our website on an anonymous basis.” Max Knox's response:
  12. I've seen a couple tweets to the effect that the new Cape Epic owners are to rescind the rule around not allowing riders with drug infringements from entering the event. Is this true? Does anyone have anymore clarity on the the exact changes?
  13. have not seen a thread on this yet. another supplements company feeding people banned substances.
  14. For the past year SAIDS has already been sending drug test samples from local athletes to World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA)-accredited laboratories in various countries, including Qatar, Belgium, Italy and the USA. This has been done since WADA initially withdrew accreditation from the SA Doping Control Laboratory at the University of the Free State for 12 months in May last year. The 12-month suspension period is now over and – in spite of a temporary and partial relaxing of the suspension by WADA in August 2016 that allowed blood analyses – the full accreditation has again been withheld. The laboratory will continue to do testing of blood samples but not urine. The laboratory is run independently of SAIDS and reports to the University of the Free State. SAIDS is its primary customer for the analysis of doping control samples. SAIDS remains committed to supporting the ongoing efforts of the University of Free State to regain the full accreditation of the doping control laboratory. “SAIDS is disappointed to learn of WADA’s decision not to restore the laboratory’s full accreditation, clearly the steps taken to ensure compliance have still fallen short of WADA’s standards” said SAIDS CEO Khalid Galant. “Drug testing in sport in South Africa has not been significantly affected but the cost of testing has increased substantially, mainly due to overseas courier costs,” said Galant. “SAIDS would like to reassure national sports federations and athletes that protecting clean sport is our priority and that drug testing will continue along the robust lines that have become expected of us,” said Galant.
  15. The SAIDS Independent Doping Hearing Panel imposed a period of ineligibility of 4 years, commencing on 26 December 2015. Mr Abbot is therefore suspended and prohibited from competing and administering in the sport of Cycling as well as in any other sport in South Africa and Internationally from 26 December 2015 until 25 December 2019. Cycling South Africa respects the independence of the SAIDS process and will respect the outcome. Cycling SA further reiterates its zero-tolerance approach to doping in sport and will continue working with SAIDS in the promotion of a drug-free sport via its awareness and extensive testing programmes.
  16. The SAIDS Independent Doping Hearing Panel imposed a period of ineligibility of one year, commencing on 02 October 2016. Ms. Matthee is therefore suspended and prohibited from competing and administering in the sport of Cycling as well as in any other sport in South Africa and Internationally from 2 October 2016 – 1 October 2017. This decision may be appealed by Ms. Matthee, the UCI and SAIDS. Cycling South Africa respects the independence of the SAIDS process and will respect the outcome. Cycling SA further reiterates its zero-tolerance approach to doping in sport and will continue working with SAIDS in the promotion of a drug-free sport via its awareness and extensive testing programmes.
  17. Cycling South Africa reports that Maroesjka Matthee has been found guilty of an anti-doping rule violation after an in-competition test conducted on 8 August 2016 confirmed the presence of Pseudoephedrine. Click here to view the article
  18. JV last night: Can't get much clearer than that. This in response to that article about the 12 things that have made Sky dominate cycling. Including, I kid you not: Colour coded water bottles MucOff soaps and lubes Warm down after a race Buying tyres a year in advance An apartment at work for the mechanics to work late Marks on the top of the saddle at 4cm and 15cm from front Each rider having a bag for wet weather gear
  19. The ABSA Cape Epic set the precedent for international mountain-bike stage races by instituting a zero-tolerance policy against doping. Any rider found guilty of doping will be banned for life from the Lesotho Sky. As a result, Croeser is banned from any future participation in the Lesotho Sky. Rourke Croeser riding the first stage of Lesotho Sky 2016. Lesotho Sky has been a UCI-accredited event since 2013. From the 2015 race onwards it is a Class 1 MTB stage race. Most participants in the race are amateurs from around the world. They come to experience the unique trails of the mountain-bike kingdom. The UCI status attracts a small field of UCI teams each year, among them Lesotho’s top riders, who gain valuable racing experience and UCI points. Lesotho Sky’s UCI status is an important achievement in support of the development of cycling sport in Lesotho. Race organiser Darol Howes shared his regret about doping in cycling: “It is no secret that in the sport of cycling riders will do pretty much anything for marginal gains, but these marginal gains are the difference between 1st and 2nd or making a pay check and not. The furious competition in cycling sport and pressure to make ends meet are ultimately what makes one cheat. Because of this competition and pressure athletes put a crazy amount of time, work and effort into getting themselves ready for competition. Unfortunately, doping is a way around this. When athletes cheat they undermine the sport, and everyone who legitimately partakes, watches or supports the sport. It’s unfair to cheat and yes, life is unfair, but sport should not be. The ABSA Cape Epic set a standard with its stance against doping that needs support from the rest of the cycling community, and we at the Lesotho Sky joins them in helping make cycling a drug-free sport. This allows the athletes who truly put in the hard work with integrity get the results they deserve.” Leading up to this year’s race, we call on all contestants to keep the #mountainbikekingdom clean.
  20. Following Rourke Croeser’s positive tests for EPO and Phentermine, he has subsequently been stripped of his title for the 2015 Lesotho Sky. This judgment sees his team mate Max Knox also losing his title. The title for the 2015 race therefore goes to Matthys Beukes and Philip Buys. We appreciate the spirit in which these riders and other elite competitors approached the race. Click here to view the article
  21. The first anti-doping rule violation was for the presence of Recombinant EPO in an out-of-competition test conducted on 30 August 2015 in Andorra (Europe) before the Cross Country World Championships. The second anti-doping rule violation was for the presence of Phentermine in an in-competition test conducted on 03 October 2015 at the Isuzu 3 Towers Stage Race in Mpumalanga. Mr. Croeser requested that his B samples be tested in both cases and both confirmed the original findings. Mr. Croeser did not dispute the findings and charges against him. As a consequence, he was deemed to have waived the right to a hearing and the South African Institute for Drug Free Sport (SAIDS) last week issued a written decision. It found that he was guilty of both anti-doping rule violations. Mr. Croeser’s results extending back to 30 August 2015 will be disqualified, with all of the resulting consequences, including forfeiture of any medals, points and prizes.SAIDS handed down a written decision in which it sanctioned him to a four-year ban for each of the anti-doping rule violations but they will run concurrently. The World Anti-Doping Code obliges SAIDS to make the sanctions run concurrently because the two doping infractions occurred fairly quickly after each other and before the athlete was notified of the first offence. The four-year period of ineligibility will run from November 23, 2015 to November 22, 2019. Mr. Croeser has been given 21 days after notification to appeal the decision. Cycling South Africa respects the independence of the SAIDS process and will respect the outcome. Cycling SA further reiterates its zero-tolerance approach to doping in sport and will continue working with SAIDS in the promotion of a drug-free sport via its awareness and extensive testing programmes.
  22. Cycling South Africa reports that mountain bike cyclist Rourke Croeser has been found guilty of two anti-doping rule violations. Click here to view the article
  23. Here is an interesting read on an unknown LA-based cyclist who has more doping links than Lance. Oh, and it also appears that he now dopes to win Strava KOMs... Go figure. http://cyclingtips.com/2016/03/who-is-thorfinn-sassquatch-the-mysterious-case-of-a-los-angeles-strava-legend/
  24. UK Anti-Doping chief Nicole Sapstead admits to struggling to contain an issue that is rife in lower-level sport What is less understandable, perhaps, is doping in amateur sport; the Middle-Aged Man in Lycra who dopes to win a club race in front of one man and his dog; the 18-year-old on a semi-pro domestic team doping to win the junior national 10-mile TT. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/othersports/drugsinsport/12160508/Doping-culture-that-is-threatening-to-ruin-British-amateur-sport-could-be-worse-than-anyone-realises.html Seems to becoming the norm in amateur ranks where it is believed that the chances of getting tested are minimal
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