Jump to content

SORE QUADS - Any Ideas Please....?


Recommended Posts

I did over 60 000 km on my old MTB, and was never really conscious of sore quads other than normal race/ride fatigue.

Recently got a new 29er, and have been suffering badly from sore quads. After Hill2Hill, it was really uncomfortable for a few days, and even after long Saturday rides with big climbing. I never had this on the old bike; not looking good for Wine2Whales….

 

I know this is a really generic question, but any suggestions on these sore quads?

1. The geometry on new 29er is obviously very different to the old 1986 hardtail 26”, but I made sure all the basic dimensions were transferred onto my new rig. Obviously wider bars/shorter stem on 29er, but I made sure of same steerer-to-seat distance to seat distance, and precisely the same seat height.

2. One local boffin has suggested perhaps seat not far enough back, or perhaps the seat is too low? I have a straight seatpost, maybe I need a layback?

3. Any other suggestions? Appreciate absolutely any ideas....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

sounds like you are lacking a decent setup. you dont have to pay to get really close to a 'pro fit', so check out guides on the interwebs.

 

but rule of thumb is: sore quads, saddle too low:hammies hurting, saddle too high.

 

Also, too much riding, exertion etc. but start with your saddle fit, aka, do a proper bike fit. oh and just cos it's a 29er doesn't mean the geo is much different.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe a different crank length - but something is different about the setup for sure - you need to transfer your old setup to the new bike as closely as possible as a start point - the one measurement you should NOT rely on is handlebar to seat - rather use a plumb bob from the center of the BB as the reference point - the horizontal measure from there (vertically above the bb) to seat is important as is the distance from pedal to seat when the pedal is at it's lowest point.

 

Get those 2 measurements the same as your old bike, and then set the distance to handlebars for the first cut.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

go back to your 26 inch. The problem is that you were not made for a 29er. You should not follow feshjon. This is your punishment. Take it like a man.

 

Seriously, it could be a bit of bike setup, saddle height, or for and aft position, or just that the wheels do change your gear ratio and a new ride makes you push harder without realising it.

 

HTFU

Link to comment
Share on other sites

- the horizontal measure from there (vertically above the bb) to seat is important as is the distance from pedal to seat when the pedal is at it's lowest point.

 

Get those 2 measurements the same as your old bike, and then set the distance to handlebars for the first cut.

 

Very true.

 

I discovered an interesting (but obvious when you think about it) thing when I went to have a proper pro-fit done by Arran Brown this week. Because we measure saddle height along the seat tube, differing geometry can change the measurement significantly. I have always just taken 72.5 cm from center of BB to top of saddle on all my bikes, but Arran showed me how, despite identical saddles and crank length, this can be out by as much as 2 cm on my bikes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very true.

 

I discovered an interesting (but obvious when you think about it) thing when I went to have a proper pro-fit done by Arran Brown this week. Because we measure saddle height along the seat tube, differing geometry can change the measurement significantly. I have always just taken 72.5 cm from center of BB to top of saddle on all my bikes, but Arran showed me how, despite identical saddles and crank length, this can be out by as much as 2 cm on my bikes.

Very interesting

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very true.

 

I discovered an interesting (but obvious when you think about it) thing when I went to have a proper pro-fit done by Arran Brown this week. Because we measure saddle height along the seat tube, differing geometry can change the measurement significantly. I have always just taken 72.5 cm from center of BB to top of saddle on all my bikes, but Arran showed me how, despite identical saddles and crank length, this can be out by as much as 2 cm on my bikes.

 

True - you can't use the seatpost for an accurate measurement at all - you really MUST have setback and vertical height the same for it to feel the same.

 

Spend some time with a pro tool for replicating bike positions and you will quickly see why they do it that way, and not along the seat tube.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Besides the bike fit, which I think is the main problem here...

 

You also need to realise that climbing with bigger wheels is harder on the muscles.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't believe in fairies or all kinds of hippie stuff - but I was honestly thinking of opening the exact same thread! I have sore quads today for the first time in ages. Did beast of the east yesterday. I have done many road races lately, so it is not the dirt roadie aspect that is new. I was also worried about W2W....AND I am also on a new bike with rough guesing on transferring my setup. Seems I have an emergency setup session coming!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks everybody for your contributions, much appreciated. Seems like a proper bike fit is in order to eliminate all the subjectivity; not so easy from where I live.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sore quads is an indication that your quadriceps muscle group (which consists out of four different muscle groups) are taking to much strain. The reason for the strain can be anything from your bike set-up, your training regime, your recovery interventions, nutrition, to even an underlying physiological problem.

 

What does your current training look like? Does it compare equal to what you did with your 26er regarding intensity, volume and density of training (heart rate zone, power output, time in saddle, distance, etc)? In other words are you still doing precisely the same training, just on a different bike?

 

How old are you? Age should be factored in with regards to recovery strategies. Training with fatigue leads to longer recovery time periods and management strategies.

 

Is it the whole quad or a specific area that is affected? Like you have indicated the bike set-up might be something to look at. It might be that you are straining a section of the quads more now than previously due to your current set-up. All it actually indicates then is that you will have to do some supplementary strengthening exercises to condition that specific part of the quads. This has been seen numerous times with golfers that change their grips on the clubs and suddenly their forearms start taking a little more strain. If this is the case it is a question about conditioning.

 

Don't forget the rest - nutrition and recovery strategies (as in the case of proper cool down, stretching and supplementation).

 

A visit to a sport doctor who have knowledge of cycling might provide you with a solution.

 

Hope your sore quads become thunder quads soon. All the best.

Edited by BarHugger
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't believe in fairies or all kinds of hippie stuff - but I was honestly thinking of opening the exact same thread! I have sore quads today for the first time in ages. Did beast of the east yesterday. I have done many road races lately, so it is not the dirt roadie aspect that is new. I was also worried about W2W....AND I am also on a new bike with rough guesing on transferring my setup. Seems I have an emergency setup session coming!

 

Muscle contraction have primarily two phases of contraction - a concentric phase (muscle contracts and shortens) and an eccentric phase (muscle contracts but is forcefully stretched). It is usually during the eccentric phase of muscle contraction that the most strain can be placed on the muscle. This is accompanied by micro-trauma that can contribute to localised inflammation. Riding a mountain bike hard on slightly uneven surfaces and using your legs to absorb some of the bumps (standing) contributes to the eccentric phase of muscle contraction. In some cases this leads to a condition commenly refered to as DOMS - Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness.

 

Could this be the case with your legs?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I did over 60 000 km on my old MTB, and was never really conscious of sore quads other than normal race/ride fatigue.

Recently got a new 29er, and have been suffering badly from sore quads.......

 

 

Other than the obvious seat height possible errors as mentioned by a few posters earlier, what about the gearing?

 

Do you have the same gearing and are you riding with the same cadence as on your old 26er?

Perhaps you are riding with a different cadence and your muscles are not used to this?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also wanted to pose the same question.

Only I am still riding the same bike set up than before. But after this weekend Quads and Hamstrings quite/very sore.

Quads moreso than Hammies. Did not do any cycling Mon to Fri so it should not be overtraining.

Feel a bit wary of training that I must complete this week.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Settings My Forum Content My Followed Content Forum Settings Ad Messages My Ads My Favourites My Saved Alerts My Pay Deals Help Logout