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26" Hardtail vs 29" Dualsus for CTCT ?


wynandk
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Hi. I have two MTB available to ride the CTCT on.

Firstly a 26" hardtail, older scott hardtail (~2005) with 3x9 (42-32-32 Chainrings and 11-34T casette)

 

secondly a 29" Dual sus scott (2019)  with 2x10 (36-26 chainrings and 11-36T casette)

 

An online gear ratio calculator says I can obtain a higher AND lower speed for the same cadence on the 26"

 

Thinking that the HT will be 1-2kg lighter (have to measure it still), AND the fact that the HT will lose less power, when pedalling, due to not having a rear shock, which bike would you guys think is the better option to do the Cape town Cycle tour with? I'd obviously have to be doing enough training on that bike as well.

 

I'd have to buy slicks for the bike I'm picking either way. 

 

(Also, why are MTB slicks so cheap in comparrison?)

 

 

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Considering you are not going to win, does fastest really matter? Which one rides better, more comfortably on the road?

 

Your talking about 100km of ridding, speed is not the only factor in choice, its ur ass that needs to sit on it, which ones gonna make it complain the least.

 

Personally I'd go with whichever is more comfortable to ride. The heavier weight can even help on the downs, dunno how much there are, I would not ride that race.

 

As for the suspension, that can also very easily be mitigated by decreasing your sag to under 10% and set your tyres to around 50psi.

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Take the 26”. You answered your own question. More road relevant gearing so more speed. There are parts that you will be grateful for the big ring. Hardtail also equals no bobbing up the many persistent hills especially in the last 30km when you are already starting to get tired. 26” slicks are even cheaper at sportsmans. I’d still do the bulk of the training on the big bike with full off-road tires and squish. It will be harder. Then when you get on the 26” (commuter now basically), it will feel so easy in comparison you’ll be laughing all the way up suikerbossie. My 2c

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You don't want to use your dual on the road, it wasn't built for the road. What I mean is you are going to put unnecessary stress on the pivots by riding the bike locked out the whole time. Use the 26er with slicks. Also the amount of bikes that gets stolen there every year you will a lot less about losing a old bike than your new 1.

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Hi. I have two MTB available to ride the CTCT on.

 

Firstly a 26" hardtail, older scott hardtail (~2005) with 3x9 (42-32-32 Chainrings and 11-34T casette)

 

secondly a 29" Dual sus scott (2019)  with 2x10 (36-26 chainrings and 11-36T casette)

 

An online gear ratio calculator says I can obtain a higher AND lower speed for the same cadence on the 26"

 

Thinking that the HT will be 1-2kg lighter (have to measure it still), AND the fact that the HT will lose less power, when pedalling, due to not having a rear shock, which bike would you guys think is the better option to do the Cape town Cycle tour with? I'd obviously have to be doing enough training on that bike as well.

 

I'd have to buy slicks for the bike I'm picking either way. 

 

(Also, why are MTB slicks so cheap in comparrison?)

Let the numbers lead you to the answers

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Thanks for the comments guys. So no arguments about the 26" not being a capable ride. Sorted.

The numbers are showing you that you will have a wider gear range in the 26er . As long as you can exploit those gears it will therefore be the faster bike of the two on the day.

I have no wheelsize issues. I’m just interested in what offers the best speed.

I have a 26er dual sus that’s lighter and faster than my 29er dual sus thanks a better gearing range.

But you know 26ers are out of fashion....

 

They’re like bell bottom jeans at a 80’s party

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How about putting the 29er wheels with tiny slicks on the 26er kind of a monster cross?

That would depend on the frame? I have not tried but would a older 26" specific frame be big enough to accept 29er wheels? I tried a 650b front wheel on a 26" fork and it didn't fit. It had knobblies on and I know you mentioned tiny slicks but would it make much difference?

Not being difficult, just interested to know. 

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