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Rule of the road OFF the road


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Not rules per say but coming from a weekend warrior that is bound to be "in your way" at some point 

 

  1. don't assume we can hear you coming up - speak up if you want to pass. I'm more than happy to stop and pull over if you just make your intention known. 
  2. if you're in a group - it's a nice heads up to say 4 passing on your right or something to that effect. 
  3. please don't ride up someone's arse just because you think you're in control. Don't be a bully.
  4. don't request to pass me when 100m down the trail you've stopped anyway - and then we play cat and mouse again. 
  5. leave no trace - if you take crap on the trails - take them home with you - even if it's "organic" 
  6. i do appreciate the people that ask "are you ok" when i'm stopped at the side of the trail - but at least slow down to wait for an answer - or don't bother? 
  7. don't make detours around puddles etc - ride the damn puddle - all you're doing is destroying the trail. Don't ride the trails after a lot of rain. 
  8. pay to use the trails that are pay to use. 
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i do appreciate the people that ask "are you ok" when i'm stopped at the side of the trail - but at least slow down to wait for an answer - or don't bother? 

 

my favourite

 

How many times I've ridden past someone standing on the side and then ask if they ok or need any help or tools yet knowing full well i forgot my tools at home nor do i have any mechanical skills  :whistling:

 

But yes, agree, at least wait for an answer and help if they need it.

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my favourite

 

How many times I've ridden past someone standing on the side and then ask if they ok or need any help or tools yet knowing full well i forgot my tools at home nor do i have any mechanical skills :whistling:

 

But yes, agree, at least wait for an answer and help if they need it.

Moral support. The whole “sjoe, ja nee. that does look bad” experience.

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my favourite

 

How many times I've ridden past someone standing on the side and then ask if they ok or need any help or tools yet knowing full well i forgot my tools at home nor do i have any mechanical skills  :whistling:

 

But yes, agree, at least wait for an answer and help if they need it.

I always offer but i’ll admit i don’t always want them to accept haha

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hold your line!!!!!!!

 

this is lost on many people.

 

When you are riding, from day 1, just hold your line and remain predictable. If a rider needs to pass you they can see when there is a chance to pass, they can judge if it is safe to pass, they can decide if they have the legs to pass. Just hold your line and your pace, let the stronger rider pass you. If you pulling left and right to let people past you are unpredictable for them to judge when to pass.

 

If you reach jeep track or a dirt road then stay left and they can pass right, just like on the road.

 

Other than that, read the trail signs and follow them.

Don't litter.

Help others and be lekker.

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Try not to drag your back wheel on single-tracks, especially on downhill switch-backs. 

 

On bi-directional single-tracks or specific lines on technical jeep tracks, uphill usually has right of way. There are exceptions, like the corridor between Contermans and Meerendal. (Note: expect some debate on this ...  :ph34r: ) 

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Try not to drag your back wheel on single-tracks, especially on downhill switch-backs. 

 

On bi-directional single-tracks or specific lines on technical jeep tracks, uphill usually has right of way. There are exceptions, like the corridor between Contermans and Meerendal. (Note: expect some debate on this ...  :ph34r: ) 

Always ride further and more often than your wife.... :ph34r:

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Few more to add.

 

1. Leave enough room between you and the guy in front of you. I've seen (and been involved in) a number of crashes that have happened in instances where two guys of similar ability and speed have collided because the one at the back just didn't leave enough following distance. This means not enough time to react to a feature / obstacle / turn, which you would have otherwise been able to navigate safely if you were alone. The more technical the trail, the bigger the gap. Leave drafting to the road.

 

2. Call out unexpected / hazardous obstacles on the trail with enough gusto that other users can hear you (which is usually a bit louder than you think it'll need to be). Then, be a decent human and stop and remove that obstacle from the trail. I've seen plenty of riders riding around a fallen tree limb or toppled over rock on the trail and not stop to remove it. If you're on a paid trail you can still be decent and help out, and if you're on a free trail then you're morally obligated to help out. 

 

3. Don't be so terrified of getting wet / muddy / dirty! Nobody is going to expect you to come to a complete standstill on a straight, uneventful piece of singletrack because you don't want to ride through a shallow puddle. Unexpected things cause crashes.

 

If you're not comfortable riding through it, make your way off of the trail gradually and well in advance and walk around it off-trail. Even better, learn to pop a small manual and blast that mofo (if you're not in close proximity to others). Getting muddy is one of the best parts of riding a mtb, you should totes try it out! 

Edited by TyronLab
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was wondering about this the other day.

 

Everyone has their own strengths and weaknesses  and i wouldnt look down upon someone who is better at descending but weaker at climbing or VICE VERSA.

 

But what is the etiquette when you wanting to pass someone on a single track whether up or down???? (sometimes shouting you wanting to pass doesnt work and you just get dirty looks)

 

 

Generally speaking I always stop and pull over to the side and let faster people pass (in either direction) whether racing or just fun riding as I know its a flippen pain being stuck behind someone likewise its irritating when someone is hanging on your wheel. 

I am also sure its the same for the other person involved.

 

this is one of the reasons why i dont enter that many mass start MTB events because you bound to get stuck behind someone who cant climb or descend on single tracks.

This is further exacerbated when organizers of such events pride themselves by putting in as much single track as possible. - imagine being stuck behind someone that long just because they refuse to give way........

 

 

Of course if you racing for top spots then ignore this...

 I also hate mass start events for the same reason.I think its an ego or fear thing. If people are scared on a tech section they can't think about anything else, let alone a rider trying to pass.

 

Then there are the big egos, usually male who can't tolerate anyone else, especially a woman passing them on the downhill.

 

It would be great if people were more aware and on such events expected faster riders to come up behind and realizing they were spoiling the other riders fun, pulled over to allow them to pass. 

 

I have had to go off track on numerous occasions to pass such riders, which is fine if there is some room off track, but not ideal.

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