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Want to get set of deep section wheels. What is the best option for front and back?

 

Front 60mm and back 80mm?

 

Also do I go for clinchers or tubbies?

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60 & 80mm for Time Trailing or Iron man yes. 50 or 55mm is a much better all rounder.

 

If you want to feel and look like a pro, tubbies all the way! Just keep in mind that you probably won't have a backup vehicle or sponsor supplying endless tubbies when you puncture, like a pro :D

 

So a blown tubby will set you back between R600 & R1500 a pop, depending what you use.

 

But the "feel" and rolling resistance that tubbies offer, makes it worth while.

 

Do a search, been discussed million times here.

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I would also have to say that it depends on which brand of deep section wheels you buy. I have just got a pair of the new Zipp 808's with the Firecrest design. The new 808's are as light as the older 404's. Along with that when I was racing with them a few weeks ago in slightly windy conditions to me they performed pretty much the same as my older 404's. The main difference was that the wheels with the larger surface area rolled a lot better and were a lot more aero in the windy conditions...

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Your choice of wheels depends on your riding style.

 

If you sit in the bunch the whole way, never going to the front, deep sections are doing no good at all, IMO they are a hinderance because of the extra weight. Rather go for a really light weight wheel.

 

If you ride at the front, try to break away from the group etc, deep sections make sense, they need to be in the air to make any difference.

 

However if you are the sprinter in your team then go for the deep sections, sit in the bunch do no work and jump at the end to try win the sprint, every millisecond counts.

 

Or you could just join the countless riders that simply buy wheels to look cool.

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But the "feel" and rolling resistance that tubbies offer, makes it worth while.

 

 

Hmmmmmmm. A tubular's slightly (It is very small) rolling resistance advantage only comes in if you pump the tubby harder than what you can pump a clincher - in the 10 bar region. At that pressure the only thing you'll feel is road vibration in your goolies. But, if that floats your boat, tubbies are for you.

 

 

Do a search, been discussed million times here.

 

Yup, it has been discussed here a long time and as an old-timer here you should have been more precise with your praise for the superiority of tubbies.

 

1) Tubbies only offer better RR at higher pressures than what a clincher can tolerate.

2) Tubbies only offer lower RR when hard glue (shellac) is used. With contact glue there is hysteresis between tyre and rim that requires energy. Guess who the energy source for that is?

 

No matter what the pros ride, tubbies are an anachronism that just wont die. Like corked wine when screwtops make so much more sense.

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Get Zipp 404's. Had Zipps and Borah's, Zipps are better. The Zipp back wheel is very stiff, so you climb better.

 

With tubbies you can ride through massive potholes without snake bites.

 

I rode Argus 2010 with Borah's (50 mm), they were terrible. If you are not a heavy guy you can't ride deep section wheels in the wind.

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It all depends on your weight and I would not go deeper than 60mm on the front. The rear wheel is not affected by wind as the front one is, so go 80mm if you want to. It looks good as well. I have never ridden tubbies, but if you don't have a back up vehicle, go for clinchers. I use Enve 65 clinchers and gusts of wind can be tricky, but with my weight I can handle them and they are pretty fast. :thumbup: What wheels are you looking at?

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It all depends on your weight and I would not go deeper than 60mm on the front. The rear wheel is not affected by wind as the front one is, so go 80mm if you want to. It looks good as well. I have never ridden tubbies, but if you don't have a back up vehicle, go for clinchers. I use Enve 65 clinchers and gusts of wind can be tricky, but with my weight I can handle them and they are pretty fast. :thumbup: What wheels are you looking at?

 

 

My son is looking for wheels. He is into racing. His weight is +70kg (not sure).

He is starting to nag me about getting deep sections. He say he will pay money back ???

He saw the Blackspade wheels, price not to bad compared to some other brands. I am doing some research before buying, would like to buy the right wheels

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IMO they are a hinderance because of the extra weight. Rather go for a really light weight wheel.

Yeah, those Zipp 404 tubbies are very heavy at 1278g for the set, compared to the featherwheigt Mavic Ksyrium SR at 1445g for the set...

The 303 are heavier at 1171g and if you want really heavy tubbies, you can always opt for the 202 at a leaden 1097g.

FAIL...

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Get Zipp 404's. Had Zipps and Borah's, Zipps are better. The Zipp back wheel is very stiff, so you climb better.

 

With tubbies you can ride through massive potholes without snake bites.

 

I rode Argus 2010 with Borah's (50 mm), they were terrible. If you are not a heavy guy you can't ride deep section wheels in the wind.

 

Hahahahah that funny man! Don't scare guys off with statements like that. Riding deep section wheels in winds is all about your setup and how you handle/respond to the wind. I have both Zipps and Boras (48mm by the way and without the H) and the Zipps and I also rode the argus with Bora in 2010 without problems.

 

How long is your stem and is your setup fore/aft correct? Do you ride with sligthly locked arm on downwind side arm in gusting wind? Some questions that are important before dissing deep section wheels.

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Specs for the Rolfes www.rolfprima.com

 

TdF6060mm carbon tubular

1435gm

 

TdF38SL38mm carbon tubular

1175gm

 

Vigor α33mm alloy clincher

1480gm

 

Elan α23mm alloy clincher

1335gm

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Apologies for the hijack gentlemen, but I have the following questions...blink.gif

 

If the Deep Sections { Clinchers } are heavier than lets say a Dura Ace 7900 wheel or a Mavic Rsys ....Why go that route...?

 

Does it take less effort to turn because of the "Aero ness " of the Deep sections than the lighter wheel... ?

 

Hijack offsmile.gif

Edited by urbanroyal
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