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Train to Race


Bikeforlife
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Hi Guys

 

I might be alone with this one but training both endurance km as well as intervals does not properly prepare me for races. Despite using structured training in a periodized model, ramping up stress over 3 weeks followed by a recovery week for adaptations - Still the random nature of how power is distributed throughout a race make it a very different experience to training. Anyone got any tips how to overcome this and avoid becoming a Zombie by the end of the race?

 

Race hour 1 - Average 220w

Race hour 2 - Average 200w

Race hour 3 - Average 180w - Multiple hard efforts / attacks by the group during the last hour often mean saying goodbye and goodnight and getting dropped. Usually followed by 5 - 15min riding alone trying to convince myself that the scenery is still worth it.

 

Thank you

 

 

 

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I cant comment on modern day training techniques as i stopped racing vets road racing in the 90's . Our training consisted of 40/50 km daily going as hard as possible with any small hill /pimple on route being classified as a prime to the top . We also had certain landmarks that would be sprinted for to earn bragging rights . Flat sections of road were always rode flat out 45 to 50 kph and down hills were not there to rest but also get those big gears going . Watt meters were unheard off and HRm were just coming into play and very few of us had one so you relied on fell in your lungs and legs , if both felt good you attempted to break away from your training partners . If you asked how we trained the common answer was " Flat out " Come race time  and we raced every Saturday afternoon 80 to 100km and then rode the "Fun rides " or fund raiser races on Sunday mornings . There no ceedings so it was a mass start and being a licenced rider made no difference you had to fight to get to the front and then the race would begin for the licenced riders and any 100 km race was always a sub 2.hr 45 min time for us . I still use that same technique today and confirm it works . 

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Can't really comment on the power figures as we dont know your weight and what level you're racing at. Just judging the ratio of those figures compared to mine I'd say you're starting the race to hard as that's quite a drop off.

 

As far as training goes, I find that riding smaller rides more often as opposed to big rides less often has worked wonders for me. If you can get into a daily or every other day routine you should see some positive results.

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Hi Bike for Life...

First question is, How long have you been riding / training for? How old are you. (Need some perspective)

Some folk can ride up front and maintain the pace...all day long!

some cant, think it's just that simple.

Depends on your genes (were your folks top sportsmen/women), your lifestyle impact up to now, your overall health, how many strange diseases or viruses you've picked up in your life, how much junk food or alcohol you consume - they all have an impact.

 

Nutrition for a race is important especially if going into your third hour.

Some riders are sprinters (muscle type) and others are marathon riders...maybe you're a sprinter?

 

An important aspect to training is...train like you want to race. Not all the time though. Hill climbs can build strength and longer slower distance builds endurance. Also try and train with guys faster than you...it will stretch you to ride harder. Another important aspect is recovery. Are you recovering sufficiently in-between your training. Does your tapering before a race also give you enough time to be 110% recovered. 

 

Not everyone is the same, so we cant all get the same results but good luck with your training and hope your racing improves.

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Hi Guys

 

I might be alone with this one but training both endurance km as well as intervals does not properly prepare me for races. Despite using structured training in a periodized model, ramping up stress over 3 weeks followed by a recovery week for adaptations - Still the random nature of how power is distributed throughout a race make it a very different experience to training. Anyone got any tips how to overcome this and avoid becoming a Zombie by the end of the race?

 

Race hour 1 - Average 220w

Race hour 2 - Average 200w

Race hour 3 - Average 180w - Multiple hard efforts / attacks by the group during the last hour often mean saying goodbye and goodnight and getting dropped. Usually followed by 5 - 15min riding alone trying to convince myself that the scenery is still worth it.

 

Thank you

 

Bear in mind training is one thing, but come race day you still have to mentally beat others, we all hurt, but he who is happy to hurt the most gets the most out of his training.

 

My 2c is that hurting gets easier the more you do it and that is what we mark down as experience. But have a read a book called "How bad do you want it? Mastering the Psychology of mind over matter"

 

The other thing I will add is get a coach, a good coach does not just give you a training program, they will give you racecraft and prep beyond physical.

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Do not know the weight, as said before, however 180W is not near race output for a rave of 3hrs.

 

I would do 210 to 220W on a 4hr tempo ride, granted, I am a big boy. I feel you need to be able to train at at least 80 to 90% of your race pace from time to time whilst doing intervals at other times at 110% of FTP or thereabouts.

 

But what do I know? I am now a 50+ overweight MAMIL.

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I cant comment on modern day training techniques as i stopped racing vets road racing in the 90's . Our training consisted of 40/50 km daily going as hard as possible with any small hill /pimple on route being classified as a prime to the top . We also had certain landmarks that would be sprinted for to earn bragging rights . Flat sections of road were always rode flat out 45 to 50 kph and down hills were not there to rest but also get those big gears going . Watt meters were unheard off and HRm were just coming into play and very few of us had one so you relied on fell in your lungs and legs , if both felt good you attempted to break away from your training partners . If you asked how we trained the common answer was " Flat out " Come race time  and we raced every Saturday afternoon 80 to 100km and then rode the "Fun rides " or fund raiser races on Sunday mornings . There no ceedings so it was a mass start and being a licenced rider made no difference you had to fight to get to the front and then the race would begin for the licenced riders and any 100 km race was always a sub 2.hr 45 min time for us . I still use that same technique today and confirm it works . 

didnt we prove the other day that this was not working for you and you were getting slower ?

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A lot of guys poo-poo the use of Strava.

I use the Live Segments to monitor my training rides and races.

By entering your chosen segments you can monitor your pace for each one. You can see if you are riding at your fastest pace and decide if you want to improve on your PB or hold back if you are not pushing today.

(I was able to detect some poor nutrition decisions by monitoring my pace on rides... my pace was way off and I felt so sluggish (was overusing energy bars - daily).

Also great for races where you can monitor your pace and decide whether its PUSH or HOLD the pace.

On my last race (Wartburg MTB) my segments didn't load so I was riding "in the dark".

Yes, it costs about R70 per month but wouldn't be without it!

Each one to their own training device...

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