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Bike washing...


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Bike washing  

77 members have voted

  1. 1. Who washes your bike?

    • Yourself
      74
    • Bike shop (wash + lube)
      7
    • Bike park bike washer (or race washer)
      3
    • No one...
      1
  2. 2. If someone else does it for you, do you go through it afterwards or leave it as is?

    • Go over it when I get home
      31
    • Leave it as is
      46


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So lemme jump in on this... Having been involved with the industrial cleaning chemical industry for the last decade.

 

There is a difference between neutral PH, and neutral chemical. Unfortunately, even chemical companies dont properly use this is marketing materials, hell, even reps who are seasoned get this wrong.

 

Neutral pH is neutral pH. Distilled water. No worries. What we are concerned with is neutral chemical. That means, if the surface you're cleaning wont be harmed by water, then it wont be harmed by the product. However, even if its classed as neutral, it doesn't mean it can't do other damage unintentionally.

 

A neutral degreaser is still a degreaser. So it will remove grease but not damage the surface youre cleaning. On a stove? Amazing. On a bike? Well, unless you can rinse it off quickly and completely, it'll break down the grease in bearings. May be quick, may be over time. But it'll do it.

 

The salt in dishwasher is correct. However, its mostly paint damage you're worried about as the salt will attack the clear coat. Underdiluted, it may take a LOT longer, but when you're chucking 50ml into 500ml water, you're asking for trouble.

 

Then we have to ask the question - why do you need ANYTHING in the wash liquor? Your bike will have picked up dust, dirt, and mud. Technically, the only thing a degreaser will do is move the dust faster, but it wont make a difference to the end result.

 

Best thing to do its wash the bike with clean water. Treat nicks and scratches with a spot polish. Greasy parts, ideally, are bettee cleaned by removing and wiping them clean with a rag. If you're not using chemistry, you're not stripping the grease each wash so relubing will have much longer intervals with better peace of mind.

 

A polish or paint finish is fine to make it shine. But really, you dont need to wash with soap!

 

Take it, leave it, do what you want. But just cause one application requires soap, doesn't mean it applies to everything.

just to back up this post,

 

At the previous dealership I worked at the entire front facing "wall" is glass. I'm talking 3 different brands of car side by side, probably a good 200+m long and triple volume high. The dealership was also right next to the busiest section of highway in JHB, that means plenty of fall-off from the highway traffic.

 

Once a month a cleaning crew would arrive to clean the windows, guess what they used.

Distilled water, no chemicals, no high pressure, just distilled water. Windows were always sparkling clean afterwards.

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So lemme jump in on this... Having been involved with the industrial cleaning chemical industry for the last decade.

 

There is a difference between neutral PH, and neutral chemical. Unfortunately, even chemical companies dont properly use this is marketing materials, hell, even reps who are seasoned get this wrong.

 

Neutral pH is neutral pH. Distilled water. No worries. What we are concerned with is neutral chemical. That means, if the surface you're cleaning wont be harmed by water, then it wont be harmed by the product. However, even if its classed as neutral, it doesn't mean it can't do other damage unintentionally.

 

A neutral degreaser is still a degreaser. So it will remove grease but not damage the surface youre cleaning. On a stove? Amazing. On a bike? Well, unless you can rinse it off quickly and completely, it'll break down the grease in bearings. May be quick, may be over time. But it'll do it.

 

The salt in dishwasher is correct. However, its mostly paint damage you're worried about as the salt will attack the clear coat. Underdiluted, it may take a LOT longer, but when you're chucking 50ml into 500ml water, you're asking for trouble.

 

Then we have to ask the question - why do you need ANYTHING in the wash liquor? Your bike will have picked up dust, dirt, and mud. Technically, the only thing a degreaser will do is move the dust faster, but it wont make a difference to the end result.

 

Best thing to do its wash the bike with clean water. Treat nicks and scratches with a spot polish. Greasy parts, ideally, are bettee cleaned by removing and wiping them clean with a rag. If you're not using chemistry, you're not stripping the grease each wash so relubing will have much longer intervals with better peace of mind.

 

A polish or paint finish is fine to make it shine. But really, you dont need to wash with soap!

 

Take it, leave it, do what you want. But just cause one application requires soap, doesn't mean it applies to everything.

 

 

Agreed...

 

And to be clear...

 

  • Use at very low concentrations for general washing - rinse, wash, rinse, dry do not leave to stand in between. 
  • Use at mild concentrations for drivetrain - spray on cassette and chain whilst turning crank - enough to cover, don't drench such that it will settle into bearings - leave for a few minutes then clean with a small brush (I use a nail brush), rinse, done, dry, apply lube.
  • You should never leave your bike standing with any cleaning agent applied
  • Use also at mild concentrations to remove mud stains from your riding kit
  • Use also at mild concentrations to clean and disinfect cycling shoes (with a soft brush). Once dry, spray with Viromist to freshen, fragrance and keep germ free.
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Order placed. Thanks for the tip. 

 

I also forgot to use the coupon code.... grrrrr. I'm totally ok with that. I don't need to take 10% out of the pocket of hard working people. Especially not in this economic climate. Thank you for the kind offer though. 

 

 

You're a Super Star - your order has already been dispatched and will be delivered to you this afternoon. DM me if you have any questions about anything.

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You're a Super Star - your order has already been dispatched and will be delivered to you this afternoon. DM me if you have any questions about anything.

 

OH WOW!!! That is stellar service. 

Thanks so much. Will definitely test it on the two dirty girls behind me. 

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<p>

 

Agreed...

 

And to be clear...

  • Use at very low concentrations for general washing - rinse, wash, rinse, dry do not leave to stand in between.
  • Use at mild concentrations for drivetrain - spray on cassette and chain whilst turning crank - enough to cover, don't drench such that it will settle into bearings - leave for a few minutes then clean with a small brush (I use a nail brush), rinse, done, dry, apply lube.
  • You should never leave your bike standing with any cleaning agent applied
  • Use also at mild concentrations to remove mud stains from your riding kit
  • Use also at mild concentrations to clean and disinfect cycling shoes (with a soft brush). Once dry, spray with Viromist to freshen, fragrance and keep germ free.
[/quote

 

Dude, I get that you're punting this stuff, but the safest thing is still to avoid product altogether. The company I represent has the safest product in the world, but i will still recommend not involving product when washing a bike.

 

Need to get a greasy part sparkling? If you don't have an ultrasonic cleaner, then fine. But then you need to remove the offending parts and clean separately. Now you're moving from regular washing to almost a service clean and thats different. Even with light application, how do you prevent degreaser from dripping into the freebody? How can you be certain you've rinsed everything well enough to not leave residue on bearings seals, or chain rollers? What about your brake pistons, are you certain those are properly rinsed?

 

Just stay away from product on bikes for the everyday wash. You'll do more damage than good, by a long long way....

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This thread reminds me of the first think I learnt back on the hub from Johan Bornman, (May have gotten the name wrong) I was using stupid lube and nonsense on chain. Told me to get sewing machine oil. Apply, wipe of excess and ride. Super cheap and actually works.

So much to learn on lebikehub

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This thread reminds me of the first think I learnt back on the hub from Johan Bornman, (May have gotten the name wrong) I was using stupid lube and nonsense on chain. Told me to get sewing machine oil. Apply, wipe of excess and ride. Super cheap and actually works.

So much to learn on lebikehub

Yep, all in one, q in one, singer oil works brilliantly. There are some others as well.

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.....

Need to get a greasy part sparkling? If you don't have an ultrasonic cleaner, then fine. But then you need to remove the offending parts and clean separately. Now you're moving from regular washing to almost a service clean and thats different. Even with light application, how do you prevent degreaser from dripping into the freebody? How can you be certain you've rinsed everything well enough to not leave residue on bearings seals, or chain rollers? What about your brake pistons, are you certain those are properly rinsed?

 

Just stay away from product on bikes for the everyday wash. You'll do more damage than good, by a long long way....

 

 

This ties in with other posters have also noted.

 

Sadly this was some expensive school fees for me ....

 

 

Starting out on the MTB journey the bike got WASHED almost every weekend.

 

 

I was even proud of removing both wheels, and doing a proper job of it ....  The reality was that I was using too much degreaser, way too often, and ended up destroying the wheel bearing.  

 

 

 

Our current cleaning process:

- start with a clean bike and apply NAMGEAR bike polish.  (spray onto a rag, and apply to the frame).  

- now enjoy your rides ....

- dusty ride - long soft bristle brush to wipe off 99% of the dust.  Damp coth to wipe down the bike (ONLY if there is NO visible dirt on the bike... dont want to scratch the bike)

- muddy ride - Gardena fitting on the hose pipe, the type that allows me dial down the pressure to a soft water mist\spray only !!  ONLY apply the water to the muddy areas.  Make sure the mud is soft from the water, then wash it off.  When working on bikes that were not polished, and has some hardened mud I spray some NAMGEAR bikewash into these areas.

- NO degreaser sprayed onto the chain and cassette !  Remove the wheel, use a roller-wheel and the through axle to support the chain.   Now use a bit of NAMGEAR degreaser in the parktool chain scrubber.  Repeat with clean water in the chain scrubber.  Sometimes this needs to be repeated for very dirty chains.  You can see when the chain is clean and the degreaser is properly removed.  Dry.  Apply chain lube .... I do tend to over lube, work it in, then wipe off excess.

 

 

The key being the layer of polish .... dust en mudd is removed so much easier  :thumbup:

 

 

 

Buying these three NAMGEAR products cost a few rands a few years back ... using it correctly it lasts LONG.

 

 

 

 

Few weeks ago a rider commented on my "brand new bike" .... nope, it has done a good few trails, lots of dust and even a bit of mud in the last year.  :thumbup:   The first polish took a while .... keeping the bike clean, and adding the odd bit of polish is really quick.

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Yep, all in one, q in one, singer oil works brilliantly. There are some others as well.

Tried getting them on board as a lube sponsor like all other SA cyclists on instagram :P

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  • 7 months later...

Thanks, informative thread. I recently bought one of those Namgear buckets with all the cleaning stuff and brushes...first wash yesterday.

(quite a satisfying experience to take some effort and do it properly - before I use to only hosepipe or take to LBS)

Quick question about the polish, I couldn't make out from the instructions, do you polish the carbon frame as well? 

https://namgear.co.za/#products

Txs :thumbup:

 

 

 

 

 

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If you have a workshop stand, remove the wheels.  Makes it so much easier to apply the polish, using the ragged that is sprayed with polish.

 

 

Brand new bikes I often apply 5 layers of NamGear polish to get that silky smooth feel.  With the wheels off it is less than a minute for a layer.  Allow some time between layers.

 

Next wash you will be GLAD for that layer of polish !!!  Dust just brush off with a long soft bristle brush :clap:  Mudd falls off with just a soft spray.

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