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14 hours ago, Hairy on a Davidson said:

@patchesnice work!

Those paint sprayers have always intrigued me, it just makes so much sense. 

Personally I have not seen any contractors in CT using them as yet.

Yeah my HVLP is a dinky little Wagner one. I think contractors either use the full sized Wagner HVLP's or the airless systems. Wagner makes an HEA (High Efficiency Airless) which they claim reduces overspray by 50%.

I guess it much of it depends on labour rates, and here minimum wage is about R200/hr equiv.

That said, I remember school holidays where I would paint walls for my mom (child labour) and it would take forever on the textured walls (common in many SA homes), so a sprayer would make great sense there.

11 hours ago, Rocket-Boy said:

Sajid uses a HVLP system on Scott Brown carpentry.

It looks like the prep is more painful but the actual painting is a lot quicker and easier. I can imagine it would be awesome for ceilings, those things are a pain to get a streak free finish.

The prep was extensive, but to be honest, quite fun compared to cutting in with a paint brush. Maybe it was just the novelty.

The ceilings were tricky (thanks to ye ol gravity). Lots of hair and face scrubbing to look presentable for work the next day.

As for finish, it is silky smooth, but a contractor friend pointed out that on the big commercial jobs they would do, their painters would spray the undercoat and first coat, but roll the last. Reason being is that if that drywall ever requires patching and someone rolls paint over the patch, it will never blend in.

I just sprayed it all! Future me will deal with painting repairs, haha

Edited by patches
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11 hours ago, bertusras said:

Damn dude, amazing work, very impressive!

Although this nearly made me barf...

image.png.1e3e3367a1b9026f513ab20a1753dbc0.png

You and me both. A 1950's house. Original ceilings. You don't want to imagine what had accumulated up there.

P3 respirator, mechanix gloves, and a disposable full body overall.

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22 hours ago, patches said:

Youtube and practice, haha!

Over the last 2 years I've probably spent double the time watching tradie youtube channels than I have watching series or movies :lol:  Some really good stuff out there.

This would be the 5th ceiling I've replaced, so the plastering gets a little more efficient each time. As for the electrical, if it's something not too straight forward (like 3 way switching, or 2 way switching with a smart controller linked in), then I build a lower voltage (18V) test bench to try it out first. Once the concept and schematic are correct, I'll install the real deal.

Very impressive and the value of your home must be improving massively.

My only critique is to please take a hair dryer to those pendant cables to straighten them (I'm pedantic like that 😁)

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A question for the woodworkers: Where and how do you store your tools?

I have a large collection of saws, planes, hammers, clamps, chisels, squares, etc. that I inherited from my grandfather. I want to build a usable storage solution in my workshop to keep them in. Any ideas?

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1 hour ago, GrahamS2 said:

Very impressive and the value of your home must be improving massively.

My only critique is to please take a hair dryer to those pendant cables to straighten them (I'm pedantic like that 😁)

hahaha good tip. I tried to unkink them as much as possible, but they still look a little wavy.

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7 hours ago, GrahamS2 said:

Very impressive and the value of your home must be improving massively.

My only critique is to please take a hair dryer to those pendant cables to straighten them (I'm pedantic like that 😁)

Flip ... not even see that, now I can't not see it at all when looking at the pick .... @patches, your cables are mincing (CT slang reference) bro!

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On 7/21/2021 at 11:41 AM, Rocket-Boy said:

Amazing stuff!! Im amazed you went so far to get it all done, that was a lot of work!!

The screws are amazing and Im very excited to build something with one :)

Tx Rocket-Boy,

Yes, was quite a bit of work, but I enjoyed it.

Will send you one!

 

Guys,

I also have a few screws for sale, should any of you be interested.  To keep the costs down, I will also sell them without the hub, handle and gator (you can probably make them yourself!  Even if you do not have a lathe, you can make an octagonal one).  I have Red Ivory, Tambotie, Rooibos, Hardekool (leadwood) and Swarthaak to make the hub if you are interested - can also send you a blank if you want.   PS:  10% discount for you guys!    😉

The screws and nuts are all Rhodesian teak (except the one hardekool one, but that is sold already).

Leg vice screw:

600 mm long, 64 mm diameter, 12.5 mm pitch, twin start for 25 mm advance per rotation.

R 2 500 for complete set, or R 1250 for screw and nut only.

 

Face Vice Screw:

500 mm long, 50 mm diameter, 10 mm pitch, twin start for 20 mm advance per rotation.

R 2 200 for complete set, or R 1 100 for screw and nut only.

 

Wagon Vice Screw:  (Sorry, don't have a pic now)

300 - 400 mm long, 50 mm diameter, 10 mm pitch, twin start for 20 mm advance per rotation.

R 1 750 for complete set, or R 900 for screw and nut only.

 

Moxon Vice Screws (Set of 2):

300 mm long, 40 mm diameter, 7.5 mm pitch, twin start for 15 mm advance per rotation.

R 1 250 for complete set, or R 900 for screws and nuts only.

 

 

 

Leg Vice Complete.jpg

Leg Vice Screw and Nut only.jpg

Face Vice Complete.jpg

Face Vice Screw and Nut only.jpg

Moxon Vice Complete.jpg

Moxon Vice Screw and Nut Only.jpg

King hub detail.jpg

Nut Close-up.jpg

13 Screws July 2021.jpg

Edited by carrera4s
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On 7/22/2021 at 11:55 AM, patches said:

hahaha good tip. I tried to unkink them as much as possible, but they still look a little wavy.

Had the same issue in a previous house when I fitted them. Hair dryer to soften, then add some weight while it cools down. May take a few tries.

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