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ToerFiets - New Afrikaans cycling mag!


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"As of 2018, the languages most commonly spoken by individuals inside of South African households were isiZulu at 25.3 percent, isiXhosa at 14.8 percent and Afrikaans at 12.2 percent respectively. While English only accounts for the sixth most common language spoken inside of South African households at 8.1 percent,...."

 

https://www.statista.com/statistics/1114302/distribution-of-languages-spoken-inside-and-outside-of-households-in-south-africa/#statisticContainer

 

Despite what souties think, their language are not even it the top 3 of South Africa.

 

Some more stats:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_South_Africa

 

And more

 

https://www.gov.za/about-sa/south-africas-people

I'm talking in respect to the cycling community, not SA as a whole. (And when I say cycling community I mean recreational cyclists)

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I'm talking in respect to the cycling community, not SA as a whole. (And when I say cycling community I mean recreational cyclists)

I'm not even going to try and respond........

 

English mags have tried and failed many a times in SA.

 

Let's see if these guys make it.

 

Personally I don't care much for magazines.

Just spend my days on the Hub.  

Hierdie plek is soos n boom vol uile.  

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Country has vast touring bike potential. The gravel bike movement has taken riders into areas where the mountain bike racing routes don't always go.

 

Some of the Karoo gravel rides that have happened this year, especially a recent 'epic; into the Tankwa, are the stuff of legends. Whether you do it on a steel gravel bike or roll 2.1" fast-rolling tyres on your 29er hardtail, it doesn't matter. Get out there. Explore. 

 

As Weg has proven: South Africa has nearly limitless potential for domestic tourism/traveling. And bikes are a wonderful way of doing that. Local communities are swift to react to new trends.

 

We could see a range of new overnight facilities for touring riders, in some great locations, at very fair prices: bed, shower, single meal. 

Some industry ouens were keen on utilising the rail network for just that. In particular the defunct routes which have building dotted all over that would serve as overnight huts in the more remote areas.

This was before the phrase of gravel grinder was spawned forth.

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It's always funny to see the Souties think English is the preferred medium.

 

South_Africa_languages_2011.png

 

 

 

https://southafrica-info.com/arts-culture/11-languages-south-africa/

Also why even as a native/first language english speaker in SA...you are still required to show IELTS proficiency in actual english countries...wether its for academic or migration purposes. SA is not considered an English speaking country lol.

 

To quote a very common song by a local artist....” there is no taal...only mengels” here.

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..............

Hierdie plek is soos n boom vol uile.  

Bedoel jy nou die wysheid van uile.........of meen jy hulle spoeg haarbolle op? :whistling:

Edited by DJR
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Some industry ouens were keen on utilising the rail network for just that. In particular the defunct routes which have building dotted all over that would serve as overnight huts in the more remote areas.

This was before the phrase of gravel grinder was spawned forth.

I can't see the term "industry guys" or whatever variant, used on this forum and not think of that industry meeting that holy roller told us about.

 

Anyway, back to the topic.

 

WTF is up with this degenerating into a language crapfest?

 

Anything that get's our sport highlighted in a positive way is epic. Well done all involved.

 

The language part is like people claiming ownership of certain aspects of the sport. Like the guys here that bitch about people riding for KOM's or riding to race. Or people here saying you MUST have fun - all whilst conveniently forgetting that everyone is different and we all get different (and personally valuable) benefits from a bicycle.

 

Toss the prejudice and applaud bicycles.

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I can't see the term "industry guys" or whatever variant, used on this forum and not think of that industry meeting that holy roller told us about.

 

Anyway, back to the topic.

 

WTF is up with this degenerating into a language crapfest?

 

Anything that get's our sport highlighted in a positive way is epic. Well done all involved.

 

The language part is like people claiming ownership of certain aspects of the sport. Like the guys here that bitch about people riding for KOM's or riding to race. Or people here saying you MUST have fun - all whilst conveniently forgetting that everyone is different and we all get different (and personally valuable) benefits from a bicycle.

 

Toss the prejudice and applaud bicycles.

 

The corona thread is quiet so we have to find something else to fight about now  :P

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Increasing, enriching and standardizing the lexicon, will most certainly be done with valuable feedback and reader input.

There are many technically literate engineers and artisans, who can add interesting source words from their field of experience, which could evolve into Afrikaans versions for many of the English cycling terms. 

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It's always funny to see the Souties think English is the preferred medium.

 

South_Africa_languages_2011.png

 

 

 

https://southafrica-info.com/arts-culture/11-languages-south-africa/

 

 

Soutie who spent 12 years not really learning afrikaans in gov syllabus despite getting decent marks in the tests, but then went to matieland and had no option but die taal te leer ken. Die beeldskone boeremeisies was baie geimpressed as 'n soutie probeer om in hul taal te praat. Die probleem was hulle bene was die meestal toe so dit was nie eintlik die moete werd nie. Wie wil 'n pop he^ as jy nie met haar kon speel nie?

 

Afrikaans is a lovely language, but unfortunately incredibly limiting if you have a global outlook. I'm incredibly disappointed that my kids are still forced to learn it as a second language in a junior school 25 years on from democracy. I'll give this rag a whirl, but would probably wait for toast coetzer to get an ebike before i subscribed for good. interestingly I recently subscribed to the relaunched Getaway which has been very disappointing for a while

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The corona thread is quiet so we have to find something else to fight about now :P

We is not faaiting, it are only in the spirit of having a jol wif our bikehub frends.

IMO.

 

I have no issue with my fellow english speaking hubbers having a laugh at the expense of my moedertaal. I’m Afrikaans, was schooled straight through varsity in english, but my first language is K@kpraat haha. As long as they can take as well as they give ????????

Edited by morneS555
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I'm talking in respect to the cycling community, not SA as a whole. (And when I say cycling community I mean recreational cyclists)

 

Kan u asseblief meer spesifiek wees meneer ?

 

Praat u van diegene wat hul plesier vind op n lang teerpad.  Of praat u van daardie ryers wat verkies om stof op hul fietse te kry ?

 

 

Mag ons verneem hoekom u verkies om die ryers wat ernstig ry wil uitlsuit by bespreking ?

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Soutie who spent 12 years not really learning afrikaans in gov syllabus despite getting decent marks in the tests, but then went to matieland and had no option but die taal te leer ken. Die beeldskone boeremeisies was baie geimpressed as 'n soutie probeer om in hul taal te praat. Die probleem was hulle bene was die meestal toe so dit was nie eintlik die moete werd nie. Wie wil 'n pop he^ as jy nie met haar kon speel nie?

 

Afrikaans is a lovely language, but unfortunately incredibly limiting if you have a global outlook. I'm incredibly disappointed that my kids are still forced to learn it as a second language in a junior school 25 years on from democracy. I'll give this rag a whirl, but would probably wait for toast coetzer to get an ebike before i subscribed for good. interestingly I recently subscribed to the relaunched Getaway which has been very disappointing for a while

True about the Stellenbosch, but thats the Cape in general. As someone who grew up in Pretoria I can tell you that the western cape is probably the only province in this country where you can speak to a teller or waiter in Afrikaans straight off the bat without getting an empty stare back.

Imo...from a global outlook, it is worth more than being forced to learn Zulu for instance ( going by that chart alone) It has some merits...flemish Belgian as well as Dutch software companies headhunt Afrikaans programmers here due to the similarities in languages and how easily Afrikaans speakers assimilate there. i know 3 personally.

 

But in the end it doesn't matter In anycase. Soon they’ll all be forced to learn Mandarin instead lol.

Edited by morneS555
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I've never seen any stats, my personal feeling is the perception depends on which circles you hang around in. So it would be really interesting to see what the stats actually are.

 

Some totally anecdotal "stats" ....

 

In the 80's the Cape Technikon had about 60% Afrikaans students and 40% English students, in the engineering faculty.  There were four classes for first years, with the Afrikaans classes being slightly larger. Over the years the Afrikaans classes got smaller, and smaller.  Though it should be noted that more and students from an Afrikaans background insisted on attending the English classes, still the total number of Afrikaans classes kept on shrinking.

 

Afrikaans text books stopped selling in numbers justifying the printing costs.

 

By 2005 there was one SMALL Afrikaans class and three large English classes.  Few years later it became impossible justify the resources for such a small group, while turning away students that could have been in those seats, and then there were only English classes.

 

 

Now my work includes various projects at University of Stellenbosch.  No idea of what happens inside the classes, but a LOT of English is spoken by students outside of the classes !!

 

 

Obviously impossible to draw any parallels to cycling.

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Soutie who spent 12 years not really learning afrikaans in gov syllabus despite getting decent marks in the tests, but then went to matieland and had no option but die taal te leer ken. Die beeldskone boeremeisies was baie geimpressed beindruk as 'n soutie probeer om in hul taal te praat. Die probleem was hulle bene was die meestal toe so dit was nie eintlik die moete werd nie. Wie wil 'n pop he^ as jy nie met haar kon speel nie?

 

Afrikaans is a lovely language, but unfortunately incredibly limiting if you have a global outlook. I'm incredibly disappointed that my kids are still forced to learn it as a second language in a junior school 25 years on from democracy. I'll give this rag a whirl, but would probably wait for toast coetzer to get an ebike before i subscribed for good. interestingly I recently subscribed to the relaunched Getaway which has been very disappointing for a while

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